The WILLOW Project: Board of Directors

Geraghty-Rathert Anne Geraghty-Rathert, JD

Anne Geraghty-Rathert, JD, is an Associate Professor in the Legal Studies Department at Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA.  At Webster University, Anne has taught most of the substantive law courses as well as topics courses dealing with law-related cultural issues. She is currently the chair of the Women and Gender Studies program. In addition to teaching full time, Anne is also an attorney in private practice. Her primary areas of practice and research deal with legal issues arising out of violence against women, including orders of protection, clemency and commutation.

 

Thomas Eileen McManmon

Eileen is a graduate of Webster University’s Legal Studies Program with a BA in Legal Studies and a paralegal certificate. As a student, Eileen worked as an intern for Professor Geraghty-Rathert on Angel Stewart’s case. She worked as a defense litigation paralegal after graduation while continuing her work with Professor Geraghty-Rathert on the case. Recognizing a greater need, The WILLOW Project was formed in order to serve other victims. Eileen now serves as the Coordinator for the Legal Studies Department at Webster University and continues to support the WILLOW Project.

 

HigginsRobin Jefferson Higgins, JD

Robin Jefferson Higgins is an Assistant Professor, Chair, Director, and Associate Professor for the Legal Studies Department at Webster University. She earned her BA in Economics, BA in Spanish, and MA in Spanish from the University of Missouri-Columbia, as well as a Juris-doctorate from St. Louis University School of Law. Prior to her position with Webster University, she was a federal law clerk for the honorable Charles A. Shaw, United States District Court Judge for the Eastern District of Missouri. After her clerkship, she joined the law firm of Lashly & Bear, PC where she practiced School Law, Administrative Law, Worker’s Compensation, and Employment Law. She teaches a variety of courses for Webster University, such as Methods of Legal Research and Writing, Civil Litigation, Introduction to Legal Studies, American Constitutional Law, Anglo-American Legal History, School Law, and Legal Ethics.

 

« back to The WILLOW Project main page