Sherman Silber, MD

Sherman Silber, MDSherman Silber, MD, a renowned pioneer in microsurgery and infertility, is considered one of the world's leading authorities on vasectomy reversal and tubal ligation reversal surgery, as well testicle and ovary transplantation, ICSI for men with no sperm, newer and cheaper and more successful methods of IVF, ovary and egg freezing to preserve fertility in cancer patients and to extend the biological clock for reproduction in women.

Dr. Silber is the author of three medical textbooks, five best-selling books for the layman and more than 250 scientific papers on human infertility and reproduction in the most prestigious scientific and medical journals. He appears frequently in the media on Oprah, Donahue, Ted Koppel Nightline, Good Morning American, The Today Show, CNN news, ABC news, CBS news, NPR, Joan Rivers, and has had two hour long documentaries about his work produced by Discovery Channel .

Silber earned his BA from University of Michigan (1966, English, Phi Beta Kappa), went to medical school at the University of Michigan, did post-graduate training at Stanford University, and then again at the University of Michigan. His primary medical infertility practice is one of the largest referral centers in the world for the most difficult cases, and infertile couples come to his clinic in St. Louis daily from all over the world. He is also a professor at the most prestigious Sun Yat Sen University medical school in Guanzhou, China, and at the University of Amsterdam medical school in the Netherlands. He is a collaborating researcher at MIT Page Molecular Biology Lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and he collaborates also with zoos all over the world for infertility problems in endangered species, and he is an avid wildlife videographer and researcher.

His patients include doctors, lawyers, scientists, politicians, teachers, professors, economists, CEOs, administrators, fruit pickers, laborers, princes, and kings. He gives the credit for his enviable and remarkable surgical skills to the help of an African American janitor at the University of Michigan where he did much of his medical training.