Majors

 

The Philosophy Department offers not only a major leading to a BA degree, but also a Philosophy major with an Emphasis in Ethics and Society, a major in International Human Rights, and an adjunct area of concentration (minor). The Philosophy Department has been a pioneer at Webster in offering courses using the Internet. Our undergraduate students edit an annual journal of student work, Sophia, and organize themselves as the Philosophy Club.

This major provides solid undergraduate background in the areas of general philosophical concern, preparing the student for graduate work in philosophy as well as continued education in other fields.Among those who have graduate from Webster University with a major in philosophy, several have gone on to law school and are practicing lawyers. Some have gone on to graduate schools such as American University in D.C., Washington University in St. Louis, University of Colorado, Southern Illinois University, and the New School for Social Research in New York.

With an Ethics and Society major, students have the opportunity to concentrate their studies in ethical, social, and political philosophy, and to apply theory to issues and problems arising in public life.

This major offers an option for philosophy students interested in using their philosophical background to pursue work in governmental policy making, community service, law, international relations, research review, and analysis of professional codes.

Students completing the major in Ethics and Society will have studied the ethical issues pertinent to several disciplines, professions, and topics. They will have acquired a strong grounding in ethical, social, and political philosophy, and they will have gained experience in identifying and analyzing ethical issues and problems that arise in public life. Students will have enhanced their critical thinking skills, and they will have explored the relevance of moral theory to moral decision-making. They will have learned how to develop and defend positions of their own, to anticipate objections and alternatives to their own positions, and to evaluate moral problems through several theoretical frameworks.