2014 Human Rights Conference: Rights of the Family

Save the Dates: Oct. 8-9

All events will be held in East Academic Building 253/262 unless otherwise noted.

Wednesday October 8, 2014

8:30-9:00 Tea and coffee

9:00- 9:30 Welcome by Dean David Wilson, College of Arts and Sciences

Framework by Lindsey Kingston, Webster University, Institute Director and Assistant Professor of International Human Rights

9:30 -10:45 Plenary #1: Susan Frelich Appleton, Washington University School of Law, Vice Dean and Lemma Barkeloo & Phoebe Couzins Professor of Law. "Family Life and Family Law"

11:00- 12:15 Plenary #2: Katherine Kuvalanka, Miami University, Associate Professor of Family Studies. 

12:15-1:30 LUNCH

1:30-2:45 Plenary #3: Jacqueline Bhabha, Harvard University – FXB Director of Research, Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights at the Harvard School of Public Health, Jeremiah Smith Jr. Lecturer in Law at Harvard Law School. “Coming of Age: Reframing the Approach to Adolescent Rights”

2:45-4:00 Breakout Sessions A

  • Session 1: Pamela Summers, NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri
  • Session 2: Hasmik Chakaryan and Stacy Henning, Webster University, Assistant Professors of Professional Counseling. “Assisting Non-Traditional Families through Life Transitions” 
  • Session 3: David Nehrt-Flores, Missouri Immigrant & Refugee Advocates (MIRA), Organizer. “Keeping Families Together: American Immigration Policies and Consequences”

4:15-5:30 Plenary #4: Maya Sabatello, Columbia University, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Research on Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Psychiatric, Neurologic, and Behavioral Genetics. “Perfect Families: Assisted Reproduction, Disabilities, and Human Rights”

~Conclusion of day~

Thursday, October 9, 2014

9:00-9:30 Tea and coffee

9:30-9:45 Welcome and recap by Lindsey Kingston, Webster University, Institute Director and Assistant Professor of International Human Rights

9:45-11:00 Plenary #5: Shalini Nataraj, Global Fund for Women, Director of Partnerships and Advocacy.

11:15-12:30 Breakout Sessions B

  • Session 1: Kevin Drollinger, Epworth Children & Family Services, Executive Director. Session. “Giving Voice to Older Youth in Foster Care”
  • Session 2: Don Conway-Long, Webster University, Institute Fellow and Associate Professor of Anthropology. “Men, Masculinities, and the Family”
  • Session 3: Ann Rosen, Photographer. “In the Presence of Family”

12:30-2:00 LUNCH

2:00-3:15 Plenary #6: Kathryn Stam, State University of New York Institute of Technology (SUNYIT), Associate Professor of Anthropology– with Jenjira May Htoo. “Refugee Resettlement and Challenges to the Rights of the Family”

3:30-5:00 Plenary #7  Roundtable discussion – Moderated by Kate Parsons, Webster University, Institute Fellow and Associate Professor of Philosophy

5:15-5:45 Refreshments

6:00-7:30 Keynote Address: Marc Solomon, Freedom to Marry, National Campaign Director.

Introduction by Dean David Wilson, College of Arts and Sciences

~Reception~

~Conclusion of Conference~

Photo ProjectFamily of Webster Photo Project

The Institute for Human Rights and Humanitarian Studies will focus on the rights of the family for its 2014/15 Year of International Human Rights (YIHR). In support of this theme, the Institute invites all members of the Webster community to submit photos of their own families. These images will help us celebrate the importance and diversity of families around the world. These images will help us celebrate the importance and diversity of families around the world. Please share your family with us.You can submit your photos here. 

 

The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognizes the family as the “natural and fundamental group unit of society,” and the family is therefore entitled to protection by society and the state. The human rights of the family include a wide range of basic entitlements, including: the right to marry and found a family, equal gender rights within the family, the right to give full and free consent to marriage, the right to family planning, the rights of children to parental care, and the right to family reunification in times of crisis. Because human rights and universal and inalienable, these rights are not prescriptive; families come in all shapes and sizes, and human rights standards do not require families to conform to traditional roles in order to qualify for protection and respect.

Family rights gain salience in different ways around the world, depending on the issues and challenges prevalent in each society. In the United States and Europe, for instance, advocacy related to the rights of the family often intersect with LGBTQ rights – including the rights to gay marriage and adoption. In other parts of the world, issues such as forced marriage and access to family planning are at the forefront of human rights debates. Although advocacy efforts are varied and diverse, the rights of the family are essential for promoting human dignity and protecting the bonds of family love.

For more information about the Institute's Year of International Human Rights, click here.