LEAD - Educational Leadership


2017-2018 GRADUATE STUDIES CATALOG

Effective 1 June 2017 through 31 May 2018

Please see the Graduate Catalog Archives for PDF versions of past catalogs.


Course Descriptions

LEAD 6000 Introduction to Educational Leadership (2)

This course provides an overview of theories and research in education leadership. Students will actively participate in self-assessment activities and use the outcome information for setting strategic goals for their own professional development while pursuing the EdS degree goals.

LEAD 6001 Foundations in Educational Leadership (5)

This course helps students understand how the educational process occurs in the context of modern society and is influenced by the forces of the larger community. Students analyze the complex historical, cultural, sociological, philosophical, and theoretical perspectives which impact the education leadership process. They employ active inquiry, experimentation, and reflection to investigate issues of race, ethnicity, gender, disability, equity, social justice, and ethics examining the impact of these issues in urban, rural, and suburban contexts. Prerequisite: LEAD 6000.

LEAD 6002 School Administration and Resource Management (5)

Students will study theories, concepts, and models utilized in supervising school personnel and resources. They will identify and analyze legal issues, school policies, state and federal statutes, and case law that form the framework for the daily operation of a school system. Research and professional discourse will guide inquiry into strategies for problem solving, conflict resolution, decision making, and team building. Students will simulate and evaluate techniques used in policy development and implementation. They will also investigate techniques used for successful staff recruitment, training, and performance-based improvement programs. Exemplary practices for sound business and facilities management will also be articulated. Prerequisite: LEAD 6000.

LEAD 6003 Instructional Leadership (5)

This block is designed to provide students with content and site-based experiences related to multiple aspects of effective instructional leadership and school improvement. Topics will include: qualitative and quantitative research; curriculum analysis and evaluation; diversity and multiculturalism; problem solving and decision making; using data for curriculum alignment and instructional improvement, and an understanding of the design and implementation of differentiated curriculum and instruction across content areas for elementary, middle, and secondary schools. Other topics included will be characteristics of effective instructional leaders; the role of technology in education; services for special populations such as the disabled, gifted, and vocational students. Focus will be placed on the complex roles and responsibilities of the educational leader for improved student learning and engagement at the elementary, middle, and secondary levels while remaining mindful of the need for stakeholder engagement. Instructional methodology wlll Include site-based experiences, group readings, discussions and simulations, electronic communications, research studies, identification of effective practices, and interaction with practitioners in administration and personal reflection. Prerequisite: LEAD 6000. Competency in statistical analysis. Students must be concurrently enrolled in the appropriate internship in Educational Administration.

LEAD 6004 Leadership and Collaboration (5)

In this course students will explore a variety of theories, concepts, and models utilized when implementing partnerships. They will investigate the uses and applications of community and school resources in supporting families and children through research, field visits, and professional discourse. Students will analyze techniques for interacting with stakeholders and examine collaboration in interdisciplinary team efforts. Emphasis will be placed on models of communication, problem solving, conflict resolution, decision making, and team building principles and skills. Emphasis will also be placed on exemplary practices in the development of community information, networking, support systems, public relations, and media. Issues of grant identification, proposals, implementation, and evaluation will also be explored in relation to their impact on collaborative processes. Prerequisite: LEAD 6000.

LEAD 6006 Advanced Internship (1-3)

This course offers students the opportunity to extend or add to site-based application experiences. Students may continue previous experiences to include advanced projects or action research. Students may also choose new internship experiences that can strengthen their leadership skills. Students must receive approval from a faculty mentor to enroll in this course. Examples of offerings in this area are:

  • Advanced Internship: Early Childhood Administration
    Participants will develop skills and strategies for administering early childhood programs and curricula.
  • Advanced Internship: Writing Grants
    Participants will develop skills and strategies for obtaining funding from public and private sources during a site-based internship.
  • Advanced Internship: School-Community Partnerships
    This internship focuses on collaborative leadership in partnerships that support effective schools. Professional development schools, school-business partnerships, collaboratives, and networks across schools will be examined through site-based experiences and student-mentor relationships. Prerequisite: Approval of faculty mentor.

LEAD 6007 Special Education Law and Legal Issues (1-3)

These courses focus on current issues in educational leadership. Students will conduct inquiry into specific topics of professional and personal interest. Additional topics will be added as new challenges for leaders and issues are identified. This course may be repeated for credit with different topic designations. Examples of offerings in this area are:

  • Topics in Leadership: The Politics of Poverty, Race, Ethnicity, and Gender
    This course focuses on the work of social leaders in addressing issues of poverty, race, ethnicity, and gender. Practical strategies to pursue equity, diversity, and social justice will be addressed.
  • Topics in Leadership: Special Education Administration, Issues and Law
    This course examines the role and responsibility of the school principal for special education services, students with disabilities, and focuses on the perceptions of family. The course will focus on current legal issues in special education, statutory requirements, fiscal policy organizational structures and related services. Students will review laws governing special education and examine issues emanating from legal requirements from various points of view.

LEAD 6008 Foundations in Special Education Administration (3)

This course examines the roles and responsibilities of the administrators of special education at the school district, state, and federal levels. Statutory requirements, fiscal operations, organizational structures, relationships to general school administration, instructional, and related service delivery systems are investigated. Principles, processes, competencies, and skills in the areas of planning/programming, staffing, coordination/communication, and administration will be explored.

LEAD 6009 Leadership Seminar (2)

The Leadership Seminar is the culminating experience of the EdS degree in educational leadership. This course is an individualized learning experience that supports the prospective school administrator in: integrating learning from coursework, internships, and other professional experiences; completing a professional portfolio that documents knowledge, skills, and dispositions required for administrator certification; and preparing for the state assessment required for administrator certification. This course begins with an informal presentation and review of the student’s portfolio related to School of Education goals and state certification standards. Based on this evaluation, the student and instructor will develop an individual course of study addressing competencies that have not yet been documented. The formal presentation of the professional portfolio that documents all required competencies is the culminating experience of both the course and the program. Prerequisites: 36 hours and a passing score as designated by Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) on the SLLA for students residing in Missouri.  For students residing in other states or countries, they must pass the certification assessment is required by their state and provide verification to Webster University’s Certification Officer.

LEAD 6119 Educational Foundations of Administration (3)

This course assists leaders of the school district in understanding the historical aspect of school districts and how the beginning influences education today. Leadership at the building level will be examined. The school leadership student will study the role of the principal as an educational leader. Students will develop an understanding of the theory and research that describe the effective school and will identify specific strategies to implement that knowledge in order to lead a high performing learning community. Students will employ active inquiry, experimentation, and reflection to investigate issues of ethnicity, gender, disability, equity, social justice, and ethics. Students will consider the impact of these issues in urban, rural and suburban contexts.

LEAD 6120 Research I (2)

This course allows the instructor to model effective instructional practices and provide opportunities for hands-on learning in the area of educational research. Students will evaluate educational research methodology; compare various types of research: action research, qualitative and quantitative educational research, examine internal and external validity, sampling methods, data analysis, and components of research reports. The course will include a discussion and procedures and skills necessary for the critical review of educational research.  Students will have an increased knowledge of educational research, and how it applies to education and the school improvement process. Students will also have opportunities to interpret and analyze test results and data and develop strategies for improvement of academic achievement.

LEAD 6121 Portfolio Based Analysis (2)

The Leadership Seminar is the culminating experience of the EdS degree in educational leadership. This course is an individualized learning experience that supports the prospective school administrator in: integrating learning from coursework, internships, and other professional experiences; completing a professional portfolio that documents knowledge, skills, and dispositions required for administrator certification; and preparing for the state assessment required for administrator certification. This course begins with an informal presentation and review of the student’s portfolio related to School of Education goals and state certification standards. Based on this evaluation, the student and instructor will develop an individual course of study addressing competencies that have not yet been documented. The formal presentation of the professional portfolio that documents all required competencies is the culminating experience of both the course and the program. Prerequisite: 27 credit hours in the EdS program.

LEAD 6122 Special Education and Law (3)

Students review the laws governing special education at federal and state levels and address these issues from an administrative perspective. The class covers the interpretive framework encompassing recent judicial decisions that emphasize inclusion. Topics to be covered include: American Legal System, Federal Policy and Disability, Safe Schools Act, IDEA, Zero Reject, Testing, Classification, Placement, Appropriate Education, LRE, Due Process, Parent participation and Shared Decision Making, Compliance Through the Courts, and School Reform. Students will increase their knowledge and understanding of political dynamics of constitutional law, the foundations of special education law, and the process of federal, state, and local education agencies. Special attention will be given to the Safe Schools Act and its specific application to students with disabilities, reauthorization of IDEA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, NCLB and the American with Disabilities Act. This course examines the role and responsibilities of the administrator, director, or supervisor of special education at the school district, state, and federal levels. Statutory requirements, fiscal basis, organizational structures, relationship to general school administration, instructional and related services delivery systems are explored. Current issues in the field of special education will also be explored. This course is offered in a seminar format in which students are expected to prepare to lead some aspect of the group discussion each week. Extensive reading and research are required to successfully complete this course.

LEAD 6123 Action Research Internship Step One (2)

Action Research Internship Step One is the first semester internship. It is Step One in the Action Research sequence. In this course the student focuses on understanding action research, developing the action research design and beginning the action research project. Students must fill out an IRB to conduct research. Content of the internship must follow the guidelines stipulated for all internships as delineated in the Education Specialist Student Handbook. This course is 16 weeks (80 contact hours).

LEAD 6124 Schools and Leadership Law (2)

This course is designed to provide intense opportunities for both theoretical and practical learning in the following areas:

  • Knowledge of structure/function of the United States Court System
  • How statutory/case law impact public schools
  • Litigation in regard to FERPA and NCLB
  • Gender based decision making
  • Student rights
  • First and fourth amendments
  • High stakes testing

LEAD 6125 Building Level Administration (3)

This course is an overview of the principalship in rural, suburban, and urban education, school community relations, and school politics: principles, concepts, and issues at the federal, state, and local levels. The course will address organizational development and the benefits of mobilizing resources of time, money and people. It will include techniques of structuring a building environment that identifies institutional needs for diversity and concerns the leadership and administrative tasks of the superintendent. The course focuses on the following areas:

  • Strategic plans and system theories.
  • Organizational development and operational procedures as it relates to the building level.
  • Collaborative skills in regard to working with building level stakeholders and responding to and mobilizing community support.
  • Understand the need to promote the success of all students by responding to and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.

LEAD 6126 School Building Finance (2)

Emphasis will be placed on the role of federal, state, and local governments in funding public schools, the impact of taxation, and an overview of school funding formulas. Focus will be placed on the use of finance to impact student achievement. The successful student will:

  • Demonstrate and apply a basic understanding of the principles of sound financial management.
  • Identify the contribution of education to the economy.
  • Identify the major components of developing, implementing, changing and evaluating a building level budget.
  • Identify and apply the processes of financial accounting, auditing, and reporting.
  • Identify and apply the processes of financial accounting, auditing, and reporting by developing a building level budget.
  • Evaluate and reallocate financial resources to improve student results.

LEAD 6127 Personnel (2)

This course focuses on identifying, analyzing, and developing effective methods of systems/building personnel administration and facilitation Topics include: statutory and procedurals issues, human resources planning; recruitment; selection; professional development/evaluation; legal/ethical issues; and formal/informal negotiations.

LEAD 6128 Facilities & Building Level Management (1)

This course presents a practical based view of school facilities with some introduction to the foundations, techniques, and principles, related to the planning, maintenance, and remodeling of school buildings. This course allows the instructor to model effective instructional practices and provide opportunities for hands-on learning. If possible, students will visit both a school construction site and an older building. Students will then compare the buildings and how they both contribute to the educational environment. Students will also interview custodians and assist with developing a schedule for building cleanliness and maintenance. Methods for forecasting enrollment also will be studied. The student will:

  • Be knowledgeable of the foundations, techniques, and principles related to educational facility planning.
  • Learn the role of the building level administrator in modernizing, maintaining, and operating an existing facility.
  • Explore the role of the building level administrator in building a new facility. Have hands on opportunities to plan for forecast enrollment.

LEAD 6129 Curriculum (2)

This course is designed to increase theoretical and practical knowledge about curriculum assessment, evaluation and the revision cycle across a school system/district from the perspective of the building principal of preK-12. It will also explore and evaluate differentiated instruction across the content areas. The goals of curriculum inquiries should always be to improve teaching/learning and increase student performance. The culminating project for this course is to create a comprehensive district curriculum plan that includes but is not limited to the following: narrative description of district and curriculum, assessment plan, evaluation cycle and revision plan. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the EdS program, appropriate technology expertise as would be expected of a principal, and a demonstrated ability to communicate orally and through written material. Any deficits must be addressed through courses that are not part of this program.

LEAD 6130 Supervision (2)

This course will expand the student’s knowledge and experience of supervision of teachers and staff members at the building level. The student will:

  • Understand the relationship between effective communication and interpersonal relationships.
  • Understand the effects one’s behavior and decisions have on other individuals, the culture, and climate of groups/organizations.
  • Create a learning organization that supports curriculum and instructional improvement, addresses state and federal mandates, and promotes best practices.
  • Identify the different types of lesson design and develop components of an effective lesson.
  • Explore professional (staff) development and renewal options.
  • Assess data related to student learning that are used to develop the school vision and goals.  The vision shapes the educational programs, plans, and actions.
  • Research state law and district policy that direct employee sanction and termination.
  • Develop effective mentoring procedures.
  • Develop supervision alternatives to enhance professional growth and development.
  • Critique evaluation models for non-certificated staff.
  • Understand the relationship between effective communication and interpersonal relationships. 
  • Understand the effects one’s behavior and decisions have on other individuals, the culture, and climate of groups/organizations.

LEAD 6131 School and Community Relations (2)

This course will analyze the relationships between school and community, public information techniques and procedures. Students will have opportunities to both critique and develop a school and community relations plan. This course will provide a thorough examination of the school and its interaction with the community. Consideration will be given to internal and external communities and their relationships with the school as an organization. The role of communications in school-community relations and consideration of the balance of rights and responsibilities between schools and communities will be explored. Students will develop a school and community relations plan.

LEAD 6132 Seminar in Principalship: Issues and Politics (2)

The role of the principal is analyzed with reference to job responsibilities of the position, knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to successfully serve the school district. This course examines the role of principals in emerging social, economic and political contexts that are changing the nature of schooling, how schools are viewed and are transforming as well as how a principal provides leadership. This course is designed for aspiring principals and focuses on understanding a broad range of issues that are critical to the success of new principals. These issues can affect relationships and impact the future. The seminar examines major management and leadership responsibilities of principals to provide a framework for identifying and analyzing problems and discriminating among alternative courses of action.

LEAD 6133 Action Research Internship Step Two (2)

The second semester internship experience is Step Two. It focuses on continuation and completion of the action research internship project. However, students cannot begin research until they have the approval of the IRB. Content of the internship must follow the guidelines stipulated for all internships as delineated in the Education Specialist Student Handbook. This course is 16 weeks for 2 credits (80 contact hours of work).

LEAD 6134 Internship I: Dispositions (2)

In the EdS degree program, this internship involves shadowing an administrator. It is a clinical experience that is supervised, supported, individualized, and considered as advanced professional study. It offers opportunities for interns to integrate practice with values, philosophy, theory and research that allows for the examination of presumptions about leadership; discussion and application of current research; and the design and implementation of an individualized Leadership Development Plan.

In this internship, the dispositions of fair, ethics, and integrity in education are the grounding values. The focus will include spending 80 contact hours in 16 weeks working in a leadership role that helps interns to increase self-realization and awareness of the dispositions. It is essential that school leaders use the dispositions of fairness, ethics, and integrity in their decision making and in their leadership. Students are required to find an appropriate mentor, internship location, secure that placement, complete the internship plan, and have it approved by the instructor. This must be completed during the first week of the course. Timing is essential.

LEAD 6135 Internship II: Diversity (2)

In the EdS degree program, this internship is shadowing an administrator. It is a clinical experience that is supervised, supported, individualized, and considered as advanced professional study. It offers opportunities for interns to integrate practice with values, philosophy, theory and research that allows for the examination of presumptions about leadership; discussion and application of current research; and the design and implementation of an individualized Leadership Development Plan. The EdS Degree in LEAD requires the successful completion of 5 internship credits within the program. Internships are typically taken one credit at a time and are all individually planned and monitored.

In this internship, diversity in education is the grounding value. The focus will include spending 80 contact hours in 16 weeks working in a leadership role that increases self realization about the complexity of our global society and the various prejudices that are embedded in everyday life. As in the other internships, you are required to find and develop an appropriate mentor, internship location, secure that placement, complete the internship plan, and have it approved by the instructor. This must be completed during the first week of the course. Timing is essential.

LEAD 6136 Special Education Internship (2-3)

This internship is an eight week field based experience offered during the summer term. This course must be approached from the viewpoint of individuals with disabilities and/or their families. This course consists of 2 credits for 80 contact hours and 3 credits for 100 contact hours within an eight week time frame. It must follow the guidelines stipulated for all internships delineated in the School of Education Specialist Handbook.

LEAD 6138 Foundations of Special Education Administration (3)

This course is designed to prepare administrators and prospective administrators for organizing and administering educational programs for students with disabilities. This course will examine the roles and responsibilities of an administrator, director or supervisor of special education. It will include a review of state and federal statutory requirements of special education, financial procedures and obligations, organizational structures and service delivery options, relationships to general school administration and access to the general education curriculum. Topics covered will also include current trends in special education, state and federal guidelines and regulations, legal and financing aspects of special education, program planning and administration of special services.