CRIM - Criminology


2017-2018 UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES CATALOG

Effective 1 June 2017 through 31 May 2018

Please see the Undergraduate Catalog Archives for PDF versions of past catalogs.


Course Descriptions

CRIM 1100 Introduction to Criminology  and Criminal Justice (3)

This course will introduce students to criminology and the criminal justice system. The course will cover a wide range of criminological topics, including descriptions of crimes and criminals, the major elements and functions of the criminal justice system, and explanations of criminal behavior and ways of reducing crime. The course is taught from a sociological perspective and, as such, will examine the aspects of crime, law, and justice that reflect social institutions; display the functioning (or dys-functioning) of social systems; and examine how social factors, such as population demographics, ecological factors, questions of deviance, power, and social forces impact and alter out understandings of crime and how we structure our criminal justice system. In addition, we will explore a number of topical issues that are currently of great interest to criminologists, with an eye toward debating the relative merits and deficits of how the public, policy makers, researchers, and media outlets present and attempt to resolve these issues.

CRIM 1800 Careers in Criminology and Crime Prevention (1)

Provides students with career information for the subfields of criminology such as national and international security, business, government, the military, the criminal justice system, or law. Students are given guidance on how to search for and apply to graduate programs and internships, create personal statements, develop a résumé, and find jobs within the field of criminology.

CRIM 2000 Issues in Criminology (3)

Introductory level course designed to provide a brief, intensive overview of specific areas of contemporary criminology. Uses a number of approaches to explore how criminology principles are applied to a specific topic or area of interest. Topics vary each semester. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

CRIM 2200 Introduction to Forensic Science (3)

Forensic science has become a staple of modern law enforcement, and this course introduces students to some of the more common methods and techniques used by forensic scientists to identify trace evidence left behind at a scene. We will focus on using the scientific method and how to gather, analyze, and report on physical evidence. A variety of techniques will be explored, including but not limited to fingerprinting, firearms residue, human remain identifications, chemical trace analysis, and proper crime scene management. Prerequisite: CRIM 1100.

CRIM 2250 Introduction to Crime Control Systems (3)

A survey of current theory and practices of the various institutions (police, courts, corrections) that constitute the foundation of the criminal justice system, including an examination of the problems and adequacy of the system, and a comparison to international crime systems.

CRIM 2450 Victimology (3)

Takes a scientific approach to the study of victimization, including the relationship between the victims and the offenders, the interactions between victims and the criminal justice system, and the connections between victims and other societal groups and institutions such as the media, businesses, and social movements.

CRIM 3000 Topics in Criminology (3)

In-depth study of a specific area or issue in criminology. Topics vary each semester. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

CRIM 3250 Police and Policing (3)

Explores the institution of modern policing from a social scientific perspective, including the history and development of social control agencies and the role of social control agents in society. Examines modern trends in policing such as unionization, Constitutional rights, policing practices and techniques, and the organization of modern police departments.

CRIM 3300 Criminology Theory (3)

Analyzes sociological perspectives on criminology, criminal justice, and juvenile delinquency. Course addresses the nature and extent of crime nationally and internationally, evaluating the strengths and limitations of criminological theories developed to explain crime.

CRIM 3350 Gang and Small Group Deviance (3)

This course focuses on how groups like gangs can become deviant and engage in collective criminal activity. We primarily examine four topics -- social influence, social control, collective identity, and in-group dynamics -- playing particular attention to race, adolescence, gender, and street gang membership nationally, internationally, and trans-nationally.

CRIM 3500 Criminal Procedure and the Constitution (3)

This course examines the relationship between the US Constitution and criminal law. Particular attention is paid the role the Constitution plays in routine police activity such as traffic stops and the search of suspects. Additionally we examine how Constitutional Laws affect such areas as the gathering of evidence, pre-trail preparations, the rights of the accused, and the punishments available to the criminal justice system. Students will gain a firm foundation in how Constitutional principles undergird modern law enforcement, legal, and corrections paradigms.

CRIM 3610 Independent Reading Course (1-5)

Designed for individual student exploration of a given body of knowledge or a specific area of interest. Selected topics agreed upon between student and a member of the department faculty. Topic of the course, detailed learning outcomes, and means of evaluation to be negotiated between student and faculty member. Intended for criminology majors. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

CRIM 3750 GIS and Crime Mapping (3)

An introduction to the methods and application of computer aided mapping (primarily Geographic Information Systems) to analyze and interpret patterns and ecological trends in national and international crime data.

CRIM 3875 Criminology Lab (1-3)

Lab is designed to complement a 3000-level course, allowing the instructor and student to work collaboratively towards development of a course-related project. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

CRIM 4000 Advanced Studies in Criminology (3)

An advanced, in-depth analysis of a specific area or issue in a Criminology topic, leading to an independent research project. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

CRIM 4250 Corrections in Prisons (3)

This course will present basic theoretical constructs about the correctional experience and reentry, with special emphasis on evidence-based practices. This course explores historical and emerging developments in the correctional field, analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of correctional systems and the social environment within correctional institutions.

CRIM 4610 Independent Reading Course (1-5)

Designed for individual student exploration of a given body of knowledge or a specific ares of interest. Selected topics agreed upon between student and a member of the departmental faculty. Topic of the course, detailed learning outcomes, and means of evaluation to be negotiated between student and faculty member. Intended for majors. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

CRIM 4875 Advanced Criminology Lab (1-3)

Lab is designed to complement a 4000-level course, allowing the instructor and student to work collaboratively towards the development of a course related project. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

CRIM 4900 Senior Capstone in Criminology (3)

This course provides a culminating experience for criminology majors, allowing students to synthesize and apply criminological knowledge in preparation for a career. Students will use their criminology skills and knowledge to become familiar with the research, theories, and methods associated with an area of personal interest.