Conservatory Season | Webster University

Conservatory Season

To purchase tickets to all Conservatory of Theatre Arts productions please visit our new online ticketing center at https://lgcfa.brownpapertickets.com.  


Ticket reservations can also be made by calling the Fine Arts Hotline at (314) 968-7128.

Webster Students, Faculty, and Staff Free with a valid ID
$15 for Adults
$7 for Seniors, Alumni, and Non-Webster Students
$2 for children 12 and under

Fall 2019

Ismene
By Satoh Makoto
Oct. 3-6, Oct. 10–13
Thursday, Friday, Saturday 7:30 p.m., Saturday and Sundays at 2 pm
Emerson Studio Theatre

Ismene is a modern take on Sophocles' Antigone told through the eyes of Antigone's younger sister. Her beloved brothers have killed each other in battle; the king has declared one a hero and the other a traitor. When the body of her traitorous brother is delivered to her door, Ismene must decide what to do. This poignant, absurdist play explores the role of family, loyalty, and coca cola in one of the great Greek tragedies.

A "generous" reinterpretation that tells the story from Ismene's perspective and depicts her "as a figure of resistance." -Jennet Kirkpatrick

Twelfth Night
By William Shakespeare
Nov. 21-24
Thursday, Friday, Saturday 7:30 p.m., Saturday and Sunday at 2 pm
Browning Mainstage Theatre

Viola has been shipwrecked in a violent storm off the coast of Illyria; in the process she has lost her twin brother, Sebastian. She disguises herself as a boy and assumes the name Cesario for protection. Thus disguised, Viola enters the world of Twelfth Night. This cross-dressing, ship-wreck surviving, poetry-loving girl finds herself at the center of a not-so-average love triangle.

Bomb-itty of Errors
by Jordan Allen-Dutton, Jason Catalano, Gregory J. Qaiyum, Jeffrey Qaiyum, Erik Weiner
Dec. 5-8, Dec. 12-15
Thursday, Friday, Saturday 7:30 pm, Saturdays and Sundays at 2 pm
Stage III

The Bomb-itty of Errors is an award-winning Ad-Rap-Tation, hip-hop theatre retelling of Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors. The show lasts one hour and thirty minutes and is part play and part rap concert. Refreshingly current but retaining the integrity of the original.

"Bomb-itty of Errors gives the bard's slapstick farce a Generation-Y rejuvenation...scores very high on sexy-party index...You're carried along by the energetic tumble of words." - The Wall Street Journal

Spring 2020

Picnic
by William Inge
Feb. 20-23, Feb. 27-Mar. 1
Thursday, Friday, Saturday 7:30 p.m., Saturday and Sundays at 2 pm
Emerson Studio Theatre
Picnic is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

The play takes place on Labor Day weekend in the joint backyards of two widows. One house belongs to Flo Owens, who lives there with her two daughters, Madge and Millie, and a schoolteacher boarder. The other house belongs to Helen Potts, who lives with her elderly and invalid mother. Into this female atmosphere comes a young man named Hal Carter, whose animal vitality seriously upsets the entire group.

"Few writers have captured women in their social environments as well as William Inge and it's in that respect that PICNIC, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953, retains its power." —CurtainUp.com.

Miss You Like Hell
Book & Lyrics by Quiara Alegria Hudes
Music & Lyrics by Erin McKeown
Senior Directing Capstone Project
March 26-29
Thursday, Friday, Saturday 7:30 pm
Saturday and Sunday at 2 pm

Stage III
Miss You Like Hell is presented through special arrangement with and all authorized performance materials are supplied by Theatrical Rights Worldwide, 1180 Avenue of the Americas, Suite 640, New York, NY 10036.
www.theatricalrights.com

Sixteen-year-old Olivia hasn't seen her mother Beatriz in years, but—surprise!—mom just showed up in the middle of the night, with a pickup truck, the promise of the open road... and an immigration hearing looming at journey's end. Company One returns to OBERON with a powerful new musical odyssey about a daughter who gets to stay, a mother who might have to leave, and the border wall that could come between them. Quiara Alegría Hudes and Erin McKeown's Miss You Like Hell explores how many miles we can travel with the help of courageous neighbors and beautiful strangers.

"Miss You Like Hell has a timely tale to tell and a compelling reason to exist. This impassioned musical, which features a pulsing score performed by an energetic seven-piece band is directed with equal vigor by Summer L. Williams." - The Boston Globe

Machinal
by Sophie Treadwell

Senior Directing Capstone Project
April 9-12
Thursday, Friday, Saturday 7:30 pm
Saturday and Sunday at 2 pm

Stage III

First performed in 1928, and based loosely around the true events of the murder trial of Ruth Snyder in 1927, this astoundingly timeless and fearlessly frank examination of the ways society can provoke a woman's self-destruction. Machinal recognizes the truth in how all oppressions are intertwined. Outstandingly brave for its time, it remains a painfully evocative and astute study of womanhood in any age that values automation and expectations over human uniqueness in desires.

American journalist Sophie Treadwell's 1928 work 'Machinal' remains pretty extraordinary stuff, a clanking, rhythmic portrait of a woman named Helen Jones (dehumanised to Young Woman in the terse credits). She is pushed and pulled and moulded and crushed and finally snapped by the merciless industrialised conveyor belt of society. - TimeOut

Bright Star
Inspired By A True Story
Music, Book & Story by Steve Martin
Music, Lyrics & Story by Edie Bricknell
April 23-26
Thursday, Friday, Saturday 7:30 pm
Saturday and Sunday at 2 pm
Browning Mainstage
Bright Star is presented through special arrangement with and all authorized performance materials are supplied by Theatrical Rights Worldwide, 1180 Avenue of the Americas, Suite 640, New York, NY 10036. www.theatricalrights.com

Inspired by a real event and featuring the Grammy-nominated score by Steven Martin and Edie Brickell, Broadway's Bright Star tells a sweeping tale of love and redemption set against the rich backdrop of the American South in the 1920s and '40s. When literary editor Alice Murphy meets a young soldier just home from World War II, he awakens her longing for the child she once lost. Haunted by their unique connection, Alice sets out on a journey to understand her past – and what she finds has the power to transform both of their lives. An uplifting theatrical journey that holds you tight in its grasp, Bright Star is as refreshingly genuine as it is daringly hopeful.

Bluegrass on Broadway? Yes sirree. The warming sounds of banjos, fiddles and even an accordion are filling the Cort Theater, where the musical "Bright Star" opened on Thursday, bringing a fresh breeze from the South to the spring theater season. - New York Times

Webster University Dance Ensemble
May 1-3
7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2 pm
Browning Mainstage Theatre