Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Sessions #1 (Monday - 2:45PM)

Student-Centeredness as Leadership: Leading From Where You Are To Improve Learning

Moderator: Laura Rein, Dean of University Libraries, Director of Global Leadership Academy
Panelists: 
Mary Preuss, Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences Department
DJ Kaiser, Assistant Professor, Communication Arts, Reading & Early Childhood Education Department
Gladys Smith, Assistant Director, Counseling & Life Development Office
Location: 261

Webster University is a student-centered and learning-centered institution in which experiences in and around classrooms are focused on the best interests of students. While many would identify as being student-centered, fewer would identify as leaders in building a student-centered culture. This panel of faculty and academic partners will examine how taking action to be student-centered within one's role is a powerful form of leadership. Panelists will lead interactive discussion on leading from where you are to support students as they define, strive for, and excel beyond their goals.


Common Ground: Using Rubrics to Create Dialogue, Collaboration, and Meaningful Assessment

Presenter: Ashley Finley, Senior Director of Assessment & Research, AAC&U, National Evaluator for the Bringing Theory to Practice (BTtoP) Project
Location: Room 253/262

Campuses nationally are increasingly integrating direct assessment of student learning into their assessment portfolios. A significant number of these campuses have worked with the AAC&U VALUE rubrics to help guide these efforts. Essential to successful adoption and implementation of the rubrics, however, is engaging faculty and staff in critical discussions that help to move the assessment effort from an individual exercise to a shared and collaborative endeavor to improve student learning. The goal of the session is to emphasize the essentialness of faculty and staff discussions around the interpretation rubrics, application of performance levels to measure learning over time, and the use of results to inform the improvement process. As part of this process we will also consider the role of intentional assignment design to promote better learning and assessment of civic learning outcomes. Campus examples will be shared to provide ground-level perspectives on direct assessment. Campus examples of calibration, implementation of the rubrics, and the use of evidence from direct assessment to improve student learning will also be shared.

Concurrent Sessions #2 (Tuesday - 9:00 AM)

Thinking on Paper

Presenter: Bruce Umbaugh, Professor, Department of Philosophy
Location: Room 102

Students come to us trained in a style of writing that lends itself to mechanical scoring but with less experience writing to expose their own thinking to a genuine audience. This session describes using an approach from Donald L. Finkel's Teaching With Your Mouth Shut to help students learn to think of writing as a locus of intellectual inquiry, learn to explore questions and concerns before communicating a thesis, and gain practice collaborating to develop ideas.


Critiquing Across the Curriculum

Presenters:
Robin Assner, Associate Professor, Department of Art, Design and Art History
Tate Foley, Assistant Professor, Department of Art, Design and Art History
Location: Room 134

Critiques are a great way to encourage critical oral communication. Using the Socratic Method and the Critical Response Protocol we will demonstrate the critique process. We will facilitate the descriptive, interpretative and judgmental qualities inherent in a classroom critique setting. We will engage in oral methods that can be translated to many disciplines across our institution.

Concurrent Sessions #3 (Tuesday – 10:30AM)

Workshop: Getting Organized: How to Map a Vision for Effective Assessment

Presenter: Ashley Finley, Senior Director of Assessment & Research, AAC&U, National Evaluator for the Bringing Theory to Practice (BTtoP) Project
Location: Room 102

Effective assessment strategies start with the end in mind: What is the long-term vision for student change and transformation? What evidence is needed to progress toward that vision over time? What experiences will best facilitate students’ learning toward intended goals? And what resources are needed for sustained progress? Logic models are practical tools for translating questions like these into visual maps that help to make explicit the intended learning goals and the theory of change implied for achieving those goals. Put another way, logic models prod us to ask the question: “Why are we doing what we do and what can we reasonably expect to happen as a result and for whom?” By usefully illustrating the pathways required to reach intended goals, logic models provide a collaborative, flexible and generative resource for guiding systematic, data grounded inquiry into the teaching and learning process at the course, program and institutional levels.


Using Simulations and Games in the College Classroom

Presenters:
Amanda Rosen, Assistant Professor, History, Politics, & International Relations
Chad Raymond, Associate Professor of Political Science & International Relations, Salve Regina University
Nina Kollars, Assistant Professor of Government, Franklin & Marshall College
Location: Room 134

Participants will learn about the benefits and challenges of using games, role-play, and simulations in the college classroom. The instructors will also provide a wealth of resources, including samples of games and sims that can be used with little modification in their own classes.

Concurrent Sessions #4 (Tuesday – 3:00 PM)

 

Teaching Strategies for GCP Skills Areas Roundtable

Presenters:
Emily Scharf, Instruction and Liaison Librarian
Danielle MacCartney, Associate Dean, College of Arts & Sciences
Victoria McMullen, Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education 
Gad Guterman, Assistant Professor, Conservatory of Theatre Arts
Scott Jensen, Professor, Communications & Journalism Department 
Location: Room 102

Groups of faculty and academic partners have created online research guides for those teaching GCP courses. These guides have valuable teaching strategies for each skills area and can help any subject. Come to this roundtable to learn more about the guides, get some teaching tips, and talk with your colleagues about the skills areas.


Using Debate to Enhance Critical Thinking

Presenters:
Kit Jenkins, Professor, Communications & Journalism Department 
Jodie Borgerding, Instruction and Liaison Librarian
Location: Room 138

n this workshop the presenters will share experiences using debate to explore media theories. Through debate, students have to sort through the myriad of perspectives, apply the right theories in the right places and present them in a coherent flow. The ultimate classroom event is lively, scary, and a lot of fun, with emotions running very high. The students don’t love debate (the instructor does!) but they do learn the material.


Designing Simulations for Active Learning (advance registration required)

Presenters:
Amanda Rosen, Assistant Professor, History, Politics, & International Relations 
Chad Raymond, Associate Professor of Political Science & International Relations, Salve Regina University 
Nina Kollars, Assistant Professor of Government, Franklin & Marshall College 
Location: Room 134

Concurrent Sessions #5 (Wednesday - 9:00 AM)

Keystone Seminar Meeting

Facilitator: Victoria McMullen, Director of Global Keystone Seminars
Location: Room 134


Cross Campus Entrepreneurship Education (CCEE) - From Awareness to Exploration to Action to Enterprise Creation

Facilitators:
Joseph Roberts, Associate Professor, Management, Director, Entrepreneurship Program
Xiaoyuan Suo, Assistant Professor, Math & Computer Science Department
Chris Sagovac, Assistant Professor, Electronic & Photographic Media Department
Noriko Yuasa, Associate Professor, Department of Art, Design and Art History
Location: Room 136

With the support of a grant issued to Webster University by Coleman Foundation we have established The Coleman Fellows Program. This session will review the collaborative work completed by Coleman Fellows during the past academic year that has resulted in five new Certificate in Entrepreneurship Tracks. This was the direct result of the cross campus work involving faculty from three schools and several departments. This interactive session will highlight key takeaways from this year's fellows program at Webster. Participants will gain an understanding of the "niche" within entrepreneurship education that Webster University has become a leader in through the cross campus collaboration that facilitates infusion of entrepreneurship in their courses.


Strengthening Students: Learning Self-Regulation and Metacognition

Presenters:
Heather Mitchell, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Erik Palmore, Director, Faculty Development Center
Members of the 2013-14 Metacognition and Self-Regulated Learning Faculty Learning Community
Location: Room 138

This session will review the work the Metacognitive Faculty Learning Community conducted this academic year. In the fall, we worked through the book Creating Self-Regulated Learners (Nilson, 2013). We discussed and applied the self-regulated learning strategies covered in the book to our own educational experiences. We culminated the fall learning community with a workshop provided by Linda Nilson. During this Spring this faculty learning community first presented a metacognitive toolkit full of self-regulated strategies that various faculty members have used in order to strengthen students' self-awareness. This learning community then also researched, read, and ultimately created a university-wide research proposal that will investigate how Webster can contribute to the much needed research in the area of self-regulated learning in college students. This session will specifically highlight some of the accomplishments of this learning community this year including the university-wide proposed research for Fall, 2014.


Our Learners Desire Something Human: Strategies for Cultivating Social Learning in WorldClassRoom

Presenters: Dave Hallmon, Instructional Designer, Online Learning Center, Adjunct Professor, Math & Computer Science Department
Location: Computer Lab Room 106

Whether teaching online or face-to-face, successful teaching strategies are universal. Content expertise, rapport
with students, timely responses to student questions, and organization are just a few of the important qualities of
a successful teacher, regardless of teaching method or medium. This presentation will focus on strategies to
build rapport with students by cultivating social presence in an eLearning experience within WorldClassRoom.
During the presentation, we will:

  • discuss current social trends/events and explore whether these types of online interactions add value to eLearning experiences
  • briefly review current literature on social presence
  • discuss recommendations on how to humanize eLearning experiences by maximizing course tools available in WorldClassRoom.

The topic of social presence will apply to both instructors flipping their classrooms (e.g., web-enhanced) or
teaching solely online. Throughout the presentation, I will demonstrate how I have used WorldClassRoom for social
learning in own my online class, COAP 2000: Introduction to Web Programming. Some examples include instructor
introductions, presenting assignments as learning opportunities, and creating small group discussions.

Concurrent Sessions #6 (Wednesday – 10:30AM)

Understanding Intercultural Competence through the Examination of Privilege and Unconscious Bias

Presenters:
Jong Bum Kwon, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Heather Mitchell, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
Gad Guterman, Assistant Professor, Conservatory of Theatre Arts
Stacy Henning, Assistant Professor, Department of Professional Counseling
Kristen Anderson, Assistant Professor, History, Politics, and International Relations
Terri F. Reilly, Adjunct Professor, Department of Communications and Journalism
Location: Room 134

According to the GCP rubric, proficient and exemplary intercultural competence entails the development of critical self-awareness, knowledge of complex cultural word views, and sophisticated skills of empathy and communication. The teaching of such competence requires not only knowledge of other cultural groups but also intentional education into our own social-cultural biases and privileges. This session will explore the central concepts of privilege and unconscious bias through structured conversations and exercises.


Assessing and Engaging Students' Learning Preferences in the Classroom

Presenter: Stephanie Mahfood, Assistant Professor, Multidisciplinary Studies Department
Location: Room 138

In this session, participants will be introduced to an assessment tool utilized to pinpoint students' learning preferences. Examples of how this assessment was utilized across an eight-week course and the effects it had on student engagement and understanding of the course material will be discussed. Time for discussion and brainstorming regarding other meaningful uses for this tool will be embedded.


Our Learners Desire Something Human: Strategies for Cultivating Social Learning in WorldClassRoom

Presenters: Dave Hallmon, Instructional Designer, Online Learning Center, Adjunct Professor, Math & Computer Science Department
Location: Computer Lab Room 106

Whether teaching online or face-to-face, successful teaching strategies are universal. Content expertise, rapport 
with students, timely responses to student questions, and organization are just a few of the important qualities of 
a successful teacher, regardless of teaching method or medium. This presentation will focus on strategies to 
build rapport with students by cultivating social presence in an eLearning experience within WorldClassRoom. 
During the presentation, we will: 

  • discuss current social trends/events and explore whether these types of online interactions add value to eLearning experiences
  • briefly review current literature on social presence
  • discuss recommendations on how to humanize eLearning experiences by maximizing course tools available in WorldClassRoom.

The topic of social presence will apply to both instructors flipping their classrooms (e.g., web-enhanced) or 
teaching solely online. Throughout the presentation, I will demonstrate how I have used WorldClassRoom for social 
learning in own my online class, COAP 2000: Introduction to Web Programming. Some examples include instructor 
introductions, presenting assignments as learning opportunities, and creating small group discussions.

Concurrent Sessions #7 (Wednesday – 1:15PM)

Teaching Students to Ask Better Questions

Presenter: Carla Colletti, Assistant Professor, Music Department
Location: Room 134

The ability to question something is an integral part of critical thinking. But, how do we teach students this skill? In this session, we'll discuss how to improve student ability to ask higher-level questions by using the expert "think-aloud" method. After using this method in my class, along with explicit in-class activities, I found that student questioning improved. In addition to presenting my findings, we'll examine ways to bring this technique into your classroom.


Problem Based Learning

Presenter: Stephanie Mahfood, Assistant Professor, Multidisciplinary Studies Department
Location: Room 138

In this session, problem-based learning (PBL) will be discussed in terms of its similarities and differences from other methods of inquiry-based learning. Benefits and factors supporting successful PBL and potential pitfalls of PBL will be shared. Several concrete tools that can aid a course instructor in providing useful scaffolding to students engaging in PBL will be distributed. Time for brainstorming about how PBL could be embedded within the courses taught by session attendees will be allotted.


TK20 Demonstration for GCP

Presenter: Justin Bitner, Research Manager, Office of Institutional Effectiveness
Location: Computer Lab Room 106

Webster's assessment management system, Tk20, is a central resource to help manage data collection and reporting for GCP courses. This session will provide an overview of Tk20’s functionality, a summary of how Tk20 has been used across the world of Webster in the last academic year, and a demonstration of how faculty can use the system to submit assessment data for their GCP courses. Attendees will be able to access Tk20 during the session to walk through the process.

Concurrent Sessions #8 (Wednesday – 3:00PM)

Incorporating Ethics through Case Studies and Scenarios

Presenters:
Bruce Umbaugh, Professor, Department of Philosophy
John Buck, Associate Dean of Students and Adjunct Professor
Location: Room 134

"In order for students to develop the ability to make more complicated and abstract judgments about ill-structured issues, educators must create and sustain learning environments conducive to the thoughtful consideration of controversial topics: and provide supportive opportunities to practice making and explaining their own judgments about important and complicated problems."

- Patricia King, Professor, Center for the Study of Higher
and Postsecondary Education, University of Michigan

Cultivating students' ethical reasoning abilities requires helping them recognize ethical issues in realistic contexts, apply ethical perspectives, and consider the ramifications of alternative courses of action. This conversational session is about using concrete cases to explore problems, assess the values that influence their actions, and provide critical feedback regarding ethical reasoning in classes, on campus, and in wide-ranging practical contexts.


Questioning the Pedagogy of Student Collaborations

Presenter:s
Carol Williams, Associate Professor, Department of Teacher Education
Larry Baden, Associate Professor, Communications & Journalism Department
Location: Room 138


In this conversational session, participants will share their background, challenges, and aspirations using collaborative student learning methods to prime discussion about this essential teaching method. The discussion will explore ideas such as how much influence teachers should have in the collaborative process, what techniques best leverage individual contributions to collective products, and other relevant questions to challenge our thinking about student learning from and with peers.


TK20 Demonstration for GCP

Presenter: Justin Bitner, Research Manager, Office of Institutional Effectiveness
Location: Computer Lab Room 106

Webster's assessment management system, Tk20, is a central resource to help manage data collection and reporting for GCP courses. This session will provide an overview of Tk20’s functionality, a summary of how Tk20 has been used across the world of Webster in the last academic year, and a demonstration of how faculty can use the system to submit assessment data for their GCP courses. Attendees will be able to access Tk20 during the session to walk through the process.