Presentations at the 2016 Teaching Festival

Monday, February 15th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Faculty Development Center

CLASSROOMS, CO-CURRICULUM AND COMMUNITY: STUDENT TRANSFORMATION IN THE SCHOLARS LEARNING COMMUNITY

Kim Kleinman, Director, Undergraduate Advising
Bruce Umbaugh, Professor, Philosophy Department
Marcie Schumert, Assistant Director, Career Development
along with invited alumni of the Scholars Learning Community

The Scholars Learning Community has been a laboratory for increasing student autonomy and agency as learners through both coordinated courses and integrated co-curricular activities.  Instructors challenged high-achieving students to share responsibility for their learning using experiential learning, "flipped classroom," and "mouth shut" techniques. A class on metacognition and co-curricular activities provide additionally for integration and reflection. In this session, instructors and the students who have made this community their own will discuss their own evolution as learners and emerging student leaders.


 

Tuesday, February 16th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Library Conference Room

WebNet+ = Add Synchronous Video to Your Teaching Tool Kit

Paaige Turner, Associate Dean, School of Communications
Erik Palmore, Director, Faculty Development Center
Marty Martin, Director, Media & Academic Technology Services
Tyann Cherry, Manager, Online Learning Center
Scott Callaway, Core Faculty Coordinator, Orlando Metro Campus

For more than two years Webster University has been working to connect students and teachers using synchronous video technology. Last year Webster launched a formal pilot that has continued to test these kinds of experiences by creating combinations of classes that include:

  • Students logged in at one Webster location connecting with students and an instructor at another Webster location.
  • Students logged in at their own computer or device connection with students and an instructor at another Webster locations.
  • Subject Matter Experts logged in from home, connecting to a class at a Webster University location.
  • Students and Teachers logged in from home, connecting via video in a web-based environment.

This format provides courses and programs a unique opportunity to utilize the Webster campus network and create learning spaces that are multi-modal, engaging, collaborative and diverse. This panel will discuss the benefits and challenges of this format, discuss training and preparation needed to be able to deliver a successful experience and explore with the audience how this medium can be used effectively for teaching and learning.  



Tuesday, February 16th – 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Faculty Development Center

TEACHING WRITING: GENRE THEORY

Matias Ochoa, Teaching Assistant, Spanish, International Languages and Cultures

This approach aims at providing students with guidance when assigning a written task. Being framed around the systemic functional grammar, the genre theory attempts to engage students in understanding the purposeful nature of writing which is achieved through different stages. The final product is a goal oriented composition that fulfills a social function and is sociably recognized as a genre.


Wednesday, February 17th – 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Faculty Development Center

TAKING A CLASS FIELD TRIP BY YOURSELF

Kit Jenkins, Professor, Communications and Journalism
Kate Sprague, Instructional Designer and Training Specialist, Online Learning Center

It is well documented that experiences outside of class such as field trips are very powerful for students and, indeed, in the Global Citizenship Program, we are encouraged to include such activities. Easy enough when all your students are in one geographical area, but for courses conducted online, the concept becomes more challenging. As the professor, how can you create such illuminating opportunities when you can’t just set a time and place and meet the students? This presentation will compare the challenges and opportunities of field trips in both on-ground and online classes, focusing on student motivation and agency for learning. Input from the audience will be an essential element of the presentation.


Wednesday, February 17th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Faculty Development Center

MENTORING HAPPENS EVERYWHERE: THE IMPACT ON STUDENTS AND FACULTY

Larry Baden, Associate Professor, Communications and Journalism Department
Carla Colletti, Associate Professor, Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts
Heather Mitchell, Chair, Department of Psychology
Kavahn Mansouri, Senior, Communications and Journalism major

Moderated by Carolyn I. Brown, Coordinator, Writing Center and Plagiarism Prevention 

This interdisciplinary panel will share their experiences mentoring students at Webster University.  Panelists will discuss what mentoring means to them, the challenges of being a mentor, and how participating in the mentoring process has impacted them and their teaching.


Thursday, February 18th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Faculty Development Center

ROUNDTABLE: CAPSTONE AND OTHER CULMINATING EXPERIENCES: WHAT STUDENT DATA CAN TELL US ABOUT THEIR BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES

Facilitators:
Julie Weissman, Director, Office of Institutional Effectiveness
Justin Bitner, Assistant Director, Office of Institutional Effectiveness
Molly Stehn, Assistant Professor, Professional Counseling
Mary Preuss, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences
Ted Green, Professor, Department of Education

“I had a defining moment while finishing up my thesis. I realized it represented all the individual concepts learned throughout the entire program but from a global perspective. I could finally see the “big picture.” (Recent Webster graduate as reported on the AY2014-15 Outcomes Survey)

Join us as we discuss the benefits and challenges of culminating experiences from the students’ and faculty’s perspectives.  We’ll share selected results from two studies, the Outcomes Survey and the Challenging Courses Report.  Participants will learn about and have the opportunity to discuss examples of effective teaching and learning activities that could be incorporated into their programs’ culminating experiences. 


Friday, February 19 – 10:00AM – 11:00AM
Faculty Development Center

DETECTING AND REPORTING PLAGIARISM

Carolyn I. Brown, Coordinator, Writing Center and Plagiarism Prevention
Laura Hardin Marshall, Specialist, Plagiarism Prevention Program 

This workshop educates extended site directors and staff about how to detect and report an incident of academic integrity and what action to take after such an incident has been discovered. We will discuss how to use Turnitin. Step-by-step instructions illustrate how to complete the Academic Dishonesty Report and submit supporting documentation. We also provide a synopsis of common academic consequences that Webster administration, faculty, and staff can consider for each student’s situation as well as include information about the Plagiarism Prevention Program and how it can help educate students and promote their future academic success. 


Friday, February 19 – 12:00PM – 1:00PM
Faculty Development Center

USING WORLDCLASSROOM TO CREATE AN ENGAGING LEARNING COMMUNITY

Erik Palmore, Director, Faculty Development
Kate Sprague, Instructional Designer and Training Specialist, Online Learning Center

Have you ever wanted to use technology to create stronger connections with your students but don’t know where to begin?  Would you like students to express a greater interest in the course material that you’ve shared with them?  Would technology help students make a stronger connection with each other, leading to more fruitful discussions, projects, and other peer-to-peer learning?  In this workshop, participants will see examples of student-student, student-content, and student-instructor engagement facilitated by WorldClassRoom.  After exploring examples, participants will work in groups to brainstorm improvements to their courses and leave with an action plan make their courses more engaging learning experiences via technology.  Whether you are teaching an online course, or seeking to enhance your face-to-face class, participants of all delivery methods and technological experience are welcome to join. 


Friday, February 19 – 2:00PM – 3:00PM
Faculty Development Center

SAFE ZONE WORKSHOP

Mary Ann Drake, Chair, Nursing Department
Don Conway-Long, Professor, Anthropology and Sociology Department
Kate Parsons, Professor, Philosophy Department

This session is an overview of the Safe Zone workshop which is defined meant to educate individuals on LGBTQ issues and help members of college communities (students, professors, administrators, and staff) become better allies to LGBTQ students and more aware of gender and sexuality issues. This workshop will introduce the main areas that comprise the longer Safe Zone training that identifies faculty as “allies” upon completion.  Facilitators will also share how participating in Safe Zone has positively impacted their teaching.