Presentations at the 2017 Teaching Festival


Tuesday, February 14th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Library Conference Room

THE SCHOLARS LEARNING COMMUNITY IN THE CITY OF WEBSTER GROVES: INQUIRY AND ACTIVE LEARNING TO CLAIM AN EDUCATION

Kim Kleinman, Director, Undergraduate Advising
Sarah Riss, Former Superintendent, Webster Groves School District
Elizabeth (Beth) J. Stroble, President, Webster University

The Scholars Learning Community's First Year Seminar was organized around a collective inquiry into Webster Groves from our variety of disciplinary perspectives and individual curiosities. Students explored the community's businesses, churches, cultural institutions, architecture, demography, and history, reaching out to consultants in the community itself. At the Fall Convocation, President Stroble focused on Community and Identity, Diversity and Inclusion, and recognizing Stigma and Bias including in ourselves. She highlighted our University community's role in the local community. With her help, the SLC has aligned with and contributed to this effort. Sarah Riss, past Superintendent of the Webster Groves School District, has played a key role with the class as a whole, with individual students, and as a resource for all of us. This presentation will recount the results and lessons of the Scholars Learning Community's effort to bring Webster Groves into our learning as we become part of the wider campus and local communities.


Wednesday, February 15th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Faculty Development Center

COLLEGE CREDIT FOR WHAT ADULT LEARNERS ALREADY KNOW: HELPING STUDENTS DOCUMENT THEIR LEARNING

Erica Ellard, Director, Academic Resource Center
Victoria (Tori) Meyer, Associate Professor, Audio Aesthetics & Technology Dept.
Janice (Jan) Palmer, Associate Professor and Chair, Nursing Dept.
Debbie Psihountas, Professor, Business Dept.

Learn more about Prior Learning Assessment (PLA)! PLA is a means by which students, particularly adult students, may earn credit for learning that may have occurred outside a classroom. This opportunity is available to Webster students, and four members of the Webster community attended a workshop provided by the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) to learn more. This presentation will allow those individuals, who now have certificates of mastery in assessing learning for college credit, to share some of the information they learned, including how manageable this process truly is and how it can be used to help Webster students matriculate, persist, and graduate. Webster students may enroll in the online course EDUC 1000: Educational Program Analysis to help them build portfolios to document their learning. The course provides them with a meaningful framework for understanding their learning as they take an active role in shaping and presenting it for review.


Thursday, February 16th – 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Library Conference Room

WAKE THEM UP! ENGAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR THE COLLEGE CLASSROOM

Julie Smith, Instructor, Communications & Journalism Dept.

Would your students come to your class if they didn't have to? The days of "sit and get" learning are over. Come learn various techniques to engage your learners, even early on Monday mornings! Attendees will come away from this session with at least twelve new ways to engage students. Apps, websites, cell phone tools, tips and tricks - along with a pep talk on how to not be afraid to try new things in the classroom - will all be shared. Don't be a "sage on the stage." Engage your students. Make your class one they will remember.


Thursday, February 16th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Library Conference Room

FINDING THE STUDENT VOICE OF THE INTROVERT

Julie Smith, Instructor, Communications & Journalism Dept.

We know that student voice is important, but what about our students who prefer not to use their voices? Have you ever had a classroom discussion in complete silence? In this session, I will explain why I think introverts don’t need to be “fixed” and that there are many ways to participate without their actual voices. Attendees will learn how to use Twitter, Padlet, Cell Phones, Remind, Meme Generators, Image Creators and other classroom engagement tools to make sure the voice of the introvert is heard and understood in the college classroom. Let’s create a university classroom where all types of voices are heard and appreciated – not just those of the “Hermoines.” The introvert's mouth might not be active - but their minds certainly are. Let's stop ignoring them.


Friday, February 17th – 8:30 AM – 9:30 AM
Faculty Development Center

PROMOTING AGENCY AND INCLUSION THROUGH AN INTERNATIONAL PODCAST PROJECT

Kit Jenkins, Professor, Communications & Journalism Dept.
Sean Leahy, Head of Media Communications, Leiden, Netherlands

Giving students voice and showing them how to refine and post those ideas are 21st century skills. They are also skills students know they need and want, so the medium, the simple podcast, becomes a way to promote student agency. By connecting the university’s international sites together with a single project, we can also foster inclusion and diversity. In courses across Webster's international network, students made podcasts on relevant topics, shared those podcasts among campuses, and voted for their favorites. In this presentation, Kit Jenkins in Webster Groves and Sean Leahy in Leiden will share how the podcast project changed learning for their students and also how faculty can benefit from this international collaboration.


Friday, February 17th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Library Conference Room

CREATING MEANINGFUL CHANGE: BUILDING AN INCLUSIVE AND EMPOWERING CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT

Colette Cummings, Director, Multicultural Center and International Student Affairs
Liza Dister, Coordinator, Faculty Development Center

In this hands-on session, participants will strengthen their self-awareness of how they approach diverse identities (such as race, socio-economic status, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, nationality, ability/disability, etc.) while developing strategies for communicating with all students in their classes. Those who are looking for new methods to engage their students, aiming to increase inclusion in their classroom, and trying to expand their comfort level with addressing issues of identity are encouraged to participate.


Friday, February 17th – 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Library Conference Room

EVALUATING STUDENT WORK WITH TURNITIN

Carolyn Brown, Writing Center Coordinator & Plagiarism Prevention Coordinator, Academic Resource Center
Laura Hardin Marshall, Plagiarism Specialist, Academic Resource Center

This presentation will show participants how to read and evaluate a Turnitin originality report accurately, how to identify instances of plagiarism, and how to help students avoid academic dishonesty. We will also give tips and recommendations for faculty on how to maintain academic honesty in the classroom.