Poster Presentations at the 2017 Teaching Festival

Monday, February 13th – 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Faculty Development Center (Emerson Library 420)


HOW TO NAVIGATE THE IRB PROCESS

Brenda Boyce, Associate Professor, Math/Computer Science Dept.

Does the IRB application process seem challenging? Do you need more information to help your students get through this task? This poster presentation will explain the IRB process step-by-step. Participants will learn how to fill out the IRB Application Form and streamline the process to ensure quick approval.


TAP: MAKING INTENTIONAL PEDAGOGICAL CHOICES THAT FOSTER INCLUSION

Carolyn I. Brown, Writing Center Coordinator & Plagiarism Prevention Coordinator, Academic Resource Center
Erin Bullerdieck, Transitions Coordinator, Academic Resource Center

The TAP (Transition in Academic Prep) Program is a 10-day academic support program for conditionally admitted freshmen at Webster University. Students live on campus and receive two credit hours in Basic Writing and Webster 101 courses. In this panel discussion, TAP faculty, staff, and students will share their experiences in and out of the classroom with the curricular and co-curricular theme of "Privilege and Oppression." The panel will also discuss challenges providing support to students with a wide range of backgrounds, and show that by making intentional pedagogical choices, it is possible to impact student growth in just 10 days.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


REFLECTIONS ON A REFLECTIVE TEACHING COMMUNITY

Carolyn I. Brown, Writing Center Coordinator & Plagiarism Prevention Coordinator, Academic Resource Center
Liza Dister, Coordinator, Faculty Development Center
Erik Palmore, Director, Faculty Development Center

The Reflective Teaching Community was established by faculty as a place to re-convene after faculty development experiences to explore how they applied what they had learned and to discuss ideas and issues related to their teaching. As the community has developed, it has become a place to take key teaching and learning topics for discussion in an effort to connect ideas, concerns, and opportunities through collective reflection. This presentation reveals the significant personal and institutional outcomes brought about by the community's development over a five-year period.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


TEACHING MIRROR: A QUICK, EASY, AND QUANTIFIED WAY TO REFLECT ON ONE'S TEACHING

Carla Colletti, Associate Professor, Dept. of Music
Erik Palmore, Director, Faculty Development Center
David Werfelmann, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Music

This presentation will describe a partnership between the Faculty Development Center and two music faculty members in their effort to have conversations about teaching practices across multiple class sessions. By using a quick survey after every class, faculty were able to capture their impressions of what, who, and how they taught in order to explore patterns and themes later in the semester. Participants will see the results of this "micro reflection" strategy and gain insights into how the information helped motivate faculty and helped to identify areas of expansion and improvement in their teaching.


PARTNER WITH LIBRARIANS TO TEACH INFORMATION LITERACY TO YOUR STUDENTS USING VIRTUAL INSTRUCTION

Mary Anne Erwin, Instruction & Liaison Services Librarian, University Library
Judy Geczi, Instruction & Liaison Services Librarian, University Library

Librarians engage faculty in many ways to infuse information literacy throughout the curriculum. Virtual instruction is a popular format that librarians use to teach a variety of information literacy topics that support students at all levels, from incoming freshman to doctoral students. Also, no matter where a student is located (online, St. Louis area, international or extended metro/military campuses), faculty can easily incorporate any of the library’s current virtual instruction offerings into their assignments, courses and programs, or librarians can customize a virtual instruction session to fit faculty’s specific needs for a class. Faculty have the option for students to view the library’s virtual instruction during class time or outside of class, but either way, students will gain the information literacy skills they need to be successful in a class, as well as during their time at Webster, and in any chosen profession.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING: WHEN A GLOBAL CRISIS PRESENTS A LOCAL NEED

Amanda Ingabire, Student in Biological Sciences and Athens study abroad student in Summer of 2016
Dina Skias, Director of Student Affairs and Odyssey in Athens Study Abroad Program

For nearly two years, an unprecedented wave of refugees have been crossing the Mediterranean into Europe. One of the cities that found itself playing host to these people in need is Athens, Greece. Webster University Athens Campus students, staff, and faculty stepped in to help through a community service learning course that is providing our students with skills and experiences they could not have imagined as they make a difference in the lives of these refugees.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


EVOLUTION OF WEBSTER UNIVERSITY'S INTERDISCIPLINARY SCIENCE BUILDING

Craig A. Miller, Sr., Director, Facilities Planning and Management

This presentation will focus on the history or evolution of the collaborative programming, design, and construction process of Webster University's Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), which is scheduled for completion at the end of June 2017 and ready to be opened for the beginning of the fall semester of 2017. This collaborative process included the end users (Webster's students, faculty, staff, and administrators), design and construction professionals, and authorities having jurisdiction (i.e., City of Webster Groves and Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District). The ISB will be the home of the following departments of the College of Arts and Sciences: Anthropology & Sociology, Biological Sciences, International Languages and Cultures, Nurse Anesthesia, Nursing, Psychology, and Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Rationales for design decisions involving technology, lab equipment, and configurations for interdisciplinary teaching, research, and "maker spaces" will be discussed. In addition, the presentation will offer a comparison and contrast of the different concepts and building design options considered, and explain the reasoning behind selected design solutions.


SCHOOL FOR TODAY

Basiyr Rodney, Associate Professor, Dept. of Teacher Education

This poster explores the principles of School for Today as uncovered in the investigations of faculty and administrators from Webster Groves School District and Webster University. It also describes experiences in a first year seminar that is organized around these principles of democratic learning, responsive learning spaces, and community engagement.


CONNECTING FROM A DISTANCE: USING RELATIONAL-CULTURAL PRINCIPLES TO FACILITATE AN ONLINE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

Molly Stehn, Assistant Professor, Professional Counseling

Reflective teachers place value on relationship building and understand that growth-fostering relationships enhance the quality of students' learning. A more diverse and multicultural student body coupled with an increasing number of courses being offered online makes relationship building more important than ever. Participants will be exposed to theory, tools, and methods for building growth-fostering relationships with their students in online environments in a way that promotes quality learning.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


EMBEDDING LEARNING STRATEGIES AND STUDY SKILLS INSTRUCTION IN ACADEMIC COURSES TO INCREASE INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AUTONOMY

Carolyn Trachtova, Director, English as a Second Language Program

International students who come to study in the United States often find that though they are proficient in English, they are not prepared for the independent learning style of the American classroom. Many students come from educational systems that emphasize students as receivers of knowledge rather than active participants in their educational journey. In order help international students gain strategic competence and become more independent learners in their graduate and undergraduate content classes, professors can incorporate short strategy-based instruction or study skills lessons into their classwork. One scholar of language pedagogy defines strategies as “learners’ techniques for capitalizing on the principles of successful learning" (Brown, 2007, p. 258). This poster will outline strategy and study skills lessons that can be implemented to enhance common assignments such as leading an academic article discussion or presenting team projects.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


SYLLABUS GALLERY

How does the course syllabus serve as a tool for teaching and learning? If you've ever wondered what your colleagues put in their syllabi, or wondered how you might tweak your syllabus to better serve your students, here's your chance! We'll be displaying a wide variety of syllabi across disciplines in order to share and foster learner-centered practices. We welcome your participation! Email Liza Dister at edister17@webster.edu to add your own syllabus to the gallery.

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