Posters | Webster University

Poster Presentations at the 2018 Teaching Festival

Monday, February 12th – 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Academic Resource Center (Loretto Hall 40)


COLLABORATIVE STUDENT-FACULTY RESEARCH: A STUDY OF LEARNING AND MEMORY USING WESTERN HARVESTER ANTS

Victoria Brown-Kennerly, Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences
Kelsey Hausmann, BS Biological Sciences, ‘17

Laboratory research is an intense form of experiential learning. Every student pursuing a degree in the Department of Biological Sciences must complete a senior thesis research project involving a semester of faculty-student collaborative project planning, followed by a semester of active laboratory or field research supervised by the mentor. This project showcases an example of a collaborative research project, about ant behaviors, providing a case study for the learning benefits of the high-impact practice of student-faculty research. 
About the research project: Ants use navigational cues to forage for food, scout territorial boundaries, and return to the nest with materials or information. We aimed to test whether Pogonomyrmex occidentalis Western Harvester ants could learn the correct path to a food source within a novel maze, and if so how long they remember new information, and could this be quantified in the lab. We developed a navigational maze to observe and quantify ant behavior, and found that ants indeed learn a new path to food upon a single exposure, and without reinforcement can remember the pathways at least 72 hours later. We used the system to begin to quantify the contribution of each of the various navigational cues, and define which ones are critical for learning and memory.


CREATING CONNECTION WITH A CANVAS COMMONS STRATEGY

Tyann Cherry, Manager, Operations & Faculty Support, Online Learning Center
Kevin Gitonga, Manager, Training & Instructional Design, Online Learning Center
Elvir Mandzukic, Faculty Development Coordinator, Faculty Development Center
Ryan McDowell, Course Developer, Online Learning Center

Tired of having to recreate your on-ground course materials every term? Looking for an easier way to copy learning modules, assignments, quizzes and other learning objects into your web-enhanced course? Interested in what colleagues at other colleges and universities have done to promote engagement or deliver curriculum at their institution? Want a way to easily share content among a group of designated colleagues or Webster University? Canvas Commons could be the solution you have been waiting for. This poster will:

  • Give attendees an overview of Canvas Commons, what it is, and how it can be used.
  • Walk attendees through critical questions to ask when thinking of utilizing Commons in a way that promotes systemic sharing in an effort to support transparency and equity among different course sections.
  • Provide a strategy help sheet for those that are interested in using Commons in a way that can support a program, department, or even School or College sharing.
  • Challenge attendees to consider ways in which Commons can support connection of course content on a local, national, and global level.
  • Outline ways in which Commons can create more seamless collaborative opportunities with academic partners. 

FACULTY AND STUDENT VOICES: INTEGRATING AN ENGAGED LEARNING PLATFORM

Liza Dister, Faculty Development Coordinator, Faculty Development Center

Recent scholarly focus on engaged learning has created new priorities for faculty development, including a focus on student motivation and agency. This project demonstrates the grassroots process used by Webster faculty together with the Faculty Development Center (FDC) to integrate faculty and student voices into a cohesive engaged learning platform, which is now being applied throughout the FDC’s programming. By combining data from a faculty survey, analyses of student evaluations, feedback from faculty leadership, and research on student engagement, and by connecting engaged learning to institutional priorities, this faculty-sponsored platform provides principles for supporting engaged learning across Webster.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


HARNESSING THE POWER OF COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS TO IMPROVE STUDENT SUCCESS AND ENGAGED LEARNING

Student Success Portal (Starfish) Implementation Team

The Student Success Portal, powered by Starfish, launched in Fall 2017 and is being used to promote student success by aiding in student advising, facilitating communication between faculty and students, and helping students access Webster resources. This demo will show faculty, staff, and students the various features of the portal, highlighting how this tool supports student success at Webster.


IMPROVING STUDENT MOTIVATION AND INCLUSION THROUGH CASE STUDIES AND SIMULATIONS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Emmanuel Balogun, Assistant Professor, History, Politics & International Relations

This poster highlights how student engagement with problem-based case studies and simulations helps improve student motivation and helps establish a more inclusive classroom. Using classroom assessment data from an introductory international relations course and an upper-level international relations seminar, I outline the components, challenges, and steps in using case studies and simulations to engender competence, help students understand how they are effectively learning something of authentic value to their community, and motivate students to build bridges between academic abstractions and their lived experiences.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


KEY PARTNERSHIPS FOR STUDENT SUCCESS

Melissa LaMonica, Instructional Designer, Online Learning Center

In 2017, the Online Learning Center (OLC) partnered with academic departments and student support departments on special projects that were geared towards providing students with unique learning experiences as well as ensuring their success at Webster. Two such ventures include: an innovative project between the OLC and the Music Department, which saw the department offer their music theory placement exam online for the first time in fall 2017. Another innovative project was the development of an undergraduate new student orientation, which will be offered online for the first time in spring 2018. This poster presentation will focus on the experience of collaboration between these units and how such projects enrich the experiences of our students as well as facilitate their academic success. 


STACKING HIGH-IMPACT PRACTICES: STRUCTURING UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AND STUDY ABROAD THROUGH CURRICULAR, CO-CURRICULAR, AND EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Danielle MacCartney, Associate Professor, Dept. of Anthropology & Sociology

High-impact practices, such as study abroad, undergraduate research, and learning communities have been demonstrated to improve student learning, retention rates, and graduation rates. Recent findings suggest that combining high-impact practices may deepen student benefits. This study sought to assess the quality of students’ experiences from participating in an undergraduate research study abroad learning community. This program structured these practices through curricular (coursework), co-curricular (research meetings), and extra-curricular (cultural field trips) activities. This study also analyzed how such a structure affected faculty scholarship. Through interviews and observations, students reported being more engaged with the study abroad location, the research process, and the coursework than they have been in other similar experiences that were not stacked. The peer influence of a learning community ensured students who may not have applied themselves as much in class were actively engaged. Students also provided peer mentorship for the research component. This structure showed some promise for increasing faculty scholarship, but modifications to the program are recommended, including building the course offerings around background for the faculty member’s research area, having students work on smaller research questions within the faculty member’s area of expertise, and building research design training into the coursework.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


SUPPORT FOR RESEARCH AND SPONSORED PROGRAMS AT WEBSTER

Carolyn Corley, Associate Vice President, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP)

Linda Dahlgren, Senior Grants Analyst, ORSP

Eric Goedereis, Associate Professor, Dept. of Psychology and Faculty Research Director

Michael Sauer, Post Award Grant Administrator, ORSP
Kelly Young, Grants Analyst, ORSP

This poster addresses the 2018 Webster University Teaching Festival topic of “Support through Connection” by examining the relationship between faculty research and engaged student learning and spotlighting the support and services at Webster that advance these two institutional priorities. According to a 2007 white paper by ACLS (American Council of Learned Societies) and the Teagle Foundation, “an important ingredient for cultivating a campus culture marked by intellectual vitality and for enriched student learning and personal development is to recruit, support, and reward faculty members who are actively engaged in research, who value undergraduate participation in research, who are responsive to educational research, and who use effective educational practices in their classrooms.”
Established in 2016, the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) provides research planning and goal-setting, professional development support, and pre-and post-award grant services to lift administrative burdens and promote faculty scholarship, including scholarship involving students. Additionally, ORSP establishes and implements compliance policies, training, and procedures that protect faculty and the University from risks associated with highly regulated, federally-funded research activities. Members of the ORSP team work with faculty to support scholarly activities that will strengthen educational and research experiences for Webster’s students and promote opportunities for external funding. ORSP will discuss its services and resources, as well as implications for faculty and student success.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


SUPPORTING FACULTY AND STAFF TO ENSURE STUDENT SUCCESS

Sarah Kuehnle, Instructional Designer, Online Learning Center
Kate Sprague, Instructional Designer/Training Specialist, Online Learning Center

One way to ensure that our students are successful is by equipping our faculty and staff with the skills and knowledge they need to perform this task. In 2017, the Online Learning Center (OLC) partnered with the Registrar, Human Resources, and Public Safety to develop two sets of training, namely, the FERPA training and the Clery training. Both of these trainings will be available online in 2018. This poster session will shed light on the collaboration experience between these units as well as showcase the products that emerged as a result of the partnership.The presenters will also demonstrate how these initiatives will support student success. 


TEACHING WITHOUT TEXTBOOKS

Mary Anne Erwin, Distance Learning Librarian, Library
Holly Hubenschmidt, Head of Instruction & Liaison Services, Library
Nicole Miller-Struttmann, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Biological Sciences

Textbooks are expensive and many students don’t buy or read them. Is it time to move beyond the textbook to “free” resources that better support your course learning outcomes? Multiple perspectives from multiple sources (articles, book chapters, videos, case studies, etc.) can enrich your classroom, engage you and your students in real-world scenarios and create a more flexible, sustainable course and program infrastructure. Faculty will learn about materials available from the library and from Open Educational Resources (OER) depositories and the best practices for incorporating them legally and ethically into your teaching. They will also hear about one professor’s experience using excerpts from a variety of texts scanned and housed in WorldClassRoom in place of requiring the students to purchase textbooks.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


USING CASE STUDIES TO PROMOTE SOCIAL JUSTICE AND GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP IN THE CLASSROOM

Lindsay Babb, MA student, Dept. of Professional Counseling
Hasmik Chakaryan, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Professional Counseling

This presentation demonstrates how utilizing case studies, engaging guest speakers, and connecting class material to real-world events can help facilitate efficient instruction and learning in the classroom. The presentation also gives an example of how an entire class can be built on case studies and involve students in active participation, critical thinking, analysis, assessment, and treatment planning (for clinical courses) that benefit students’ learning, engagement, and ownership of class material. Presenters of this poster illustrate that engaging students in such methods can increase their motivation and leadership in social justice advocacy as well as encourage becoming informed, responsible, and caring world citizens.

Download this poster as a PDF file.


SYLLABUS GALLERY

How does the course syllabus serve as a tool for teaching and learning? If you've ever wondered what your colleagues put in their syllabi, or wondered how you might tweak your syllabus to better serve your students, here's your chance! We'll be displaying a wide variety of syllabi across disciplines in order to share and foster learner-centered practices. 

Download the 2018 Syllabus Gallery as a PFD file.