Presentations | Webster University

Presentations at the 2018 Teaching Festival


Monday, February 12th – 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

GLOBAL LEARNING IN AN ONLINE WORLDWIDE CURRICULA

Panel Presentation

Tyann Cherry, Manager, Operations & Faculty Support, Online Learning Center
Kevin Gitonga, Manager, Training & Instructional Design, Online Learning Center
Kelly Heath, Director, Office of Study Abroad
Kim McGrath, Director, Webster International Network of Schools (WINS) 
Hannah Verity, Director, Global Program Development

Teaching an international body of students is both challenging and rewarding, and can be even more so in a fully online context. What do our online faculty do to address this? With more than 700 faculty teaching online courses, Webster’s international campus network provides a unique backdrop for exploring best practices and common challenges faced in online international education. In this session, participants will discuss and consider the results from a recent faculty survey conducted at Webster, using the lens of intercultural competence. Participants will gain concrete skills, ideas, and resources for using technology and building resources and lessons in an online international classroom setting.


Monday, February 12th – 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

INTERNATIONAL CURRICULUM CHOOSE YOUR ADVENTURE: A CANVAS, WEBNET+, ONLINE, GLOBAL TEACHING STORY

Roundtable Discussion

Tyann Cherry, Manager, Operations & Faculty Support, Online Learning Center
Kevin Gitonga, Manager, Training & Instructional Design, Online Learning Center
Debbie Psihountas, Professor, Business Dept.
Hannah Verity, Director, Global Program Development

Professors continue to work hard to provide students with opportunities and curriculum that delivers meaningful experiences and provides a framework for students to grow their skills and knowledge as global citizens. More and more technology can break down old barriers to connecting students and faculty with international curricula and experts. Because of Webster University’s unique global campuses, faculty have more access to partner with international faculty across the curriculum and work together to deliver these experiences to students across the network, from Webster Groves to Florida to Geneva and back again. Come and participate in a guided discussion with two faculty members who have capitalized on delivery methods that can remove old barriers to this kind of collaboration. You will hear not only ways in which they were successful at delivery, but also about new challenges that arise when taking advantage of these opportunities. We will also be joined by a member of the Global Program Development office to talk about ways that faculty can maximize their experience and success if applying for abroad teaching opportunities, as well as a member of the Online Learning Center who will speak to how technology is often vital to the success of these endeavors.


Monday, February 12th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

INCLUSIVE TEACHING ROUNDTABLE

Roundtable Discussion

Hasmik Chakaryan, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Professional Counseling
Colette Cummings, Associate Dean of Students and Director, Multicultural Center & International Student Affairs
Kim Kleinman, Director, Undergraduate Advising
Terri Reilly, Adjunct Professor, College of Arts and Sciences
Nick Tamarkin, Instructor, School of Education
Kelsey Wingo, Sustainability Planner, Facilities Operations

What is our role in shaping inclusive classroom spaces, and what can we do as instructors to foster constructive dialogue and help our students be heard? The Inclusive Teaching Roundtable will provide faculty with an environment where they can freely share questions, successes, and challenges in creating a space where all students can maximize their own learning regardless of background. Participants will also be provided with resources to assist them in creating inclusive classrooms.


Tuesday, February 13th – 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM
Faculty Development Center (Library 420)

NAVIGATING THE DIALECTIC BETWEEN RESPONSIBLE GATEKEEPING VERSUS INCLUSIVE, STUDENT-CENTERED LEARNING

Roundtable Discussion

Molly Stehn, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Professional Counseling
Muthoni Musangali, Associate Professor, Dept. of Professional Counseling

How do we meet students where they are while also ensuring that our students meet the standards of our fields? What are our ethical responsibilities to both our students and to the populations they will interact with in their chosen fields (employees, clients, patients, students, co-workers, etc.)? Faculty often serve dual roles as instructors and gatekeepers. In the former role, faculty are devoted to students’ personal and intellectual development, and their interest is highly student-centered. In the gatekeeping role, however, faculty interest is in protecting the public from students whom faculty judge to lack competency or the capacity to practice ethically. This dilemma is further complicated by the fact that some students have experienced systematic disadvantages and marginalization through segregation in housing, education, and employment. Thus, through no fault of their own, students from such backgrounds may lack adequate preparation for academic success in higher education, which in turn may prevent them from successfully passing through the gate to their chosen profession. Attendees are invited to join the presenters in a discussion of how faculty might conceptualize and practice their pedagogy in a way that effectively meets their most vulnerable students where they are, while also continuing to ensure that all graduates are sufficiently competent.


Tuesday, February 13th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

AGENCY AND INTEGRATIVE LEARNING: EXCHANGING LETTERS

Panel Presentation

Bruce Umbaugh, Professor, Dept. of Philosophy
Samuel Harned, Student, Audit for Enrichment Program
Elizabeth Stanza, Student, Dept. of Philosophy and Dept. of Psychology double-major

One faculty member and several students discuss the experience of a “Republic of Letters” in a class. In a semester-long course on early modern science and philosophy, students corresponded with classmates through a series of letters. They were asked to “try to respond to arguments and ideas in our readings and discussion and also to the ideas and arguments raised in previous correspondence. Try to make your interaction get to the heart of ideas and arguments in ways that advance our shared, philosophical understanding. Try to get your correspondent to think harder. Give reasons for your own claims, and insist that your correspondents do the same.” In this activity, students were asked to model the intellectual interaction of their philosophical forebears. In general, students and the professor all found this to be an enjoyable and effective experience. In this session, the professor will describe the activity and his aims, and students will share their reflections on the results.


Tuesday, February 13th – 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Faculty Development Center (Library 420)

COLLABORATION & PRODUCTIVITY IN THE CLOUD - LEVERAGING THE POWER OF OFFICE 365 APPS

Workshop

Angela Astuto, Instructor, Math/Computer Science Dept. and School of Education

With the adoption of Office 365 for all faculty and students, we are poised to harness the power of these apps to promote engagement and collaboration among students. The apps available in Office 365 extend well beyond Word, PowerPoint and Excel. Whether in face-to-face classes or online, faculty and students can use Office 365 apps to create, communicate, and collaborate in new and engaging ways. This session will introduce you to the various apps available in Office 365, including some that may be new to you. We will explore ways these apps can help you promote student engagement and collaboration and strategies for choosing the apps that best meet your needs. Come with your laptop, and leave with some new instructional tools!


Wednesday, February 14th – 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

STUDENTS’ SUCCESS NETWORK: A TOOLBOX FOR ENGAGED TEACHING & HOLISTIC ADVISING

Workshop

Justin Barton, Director, First Year Experience and Undergraduate Persistence
Victoria Brown-Kennerly, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Biological Sciences 
Victoria Meyer, Associate Professor, Audio Aesthetics & Technology Dept.

As teachers, we are often sources of strength and support for students on topics that extend beyond our areas of academic expertise. Fortunately, our students exist within a network of supportive faculty and staff that have the skills and resources to help students navigate their challenges and opportunities. The recently introduced Student Success Portal makes it easier to tap into your students’ success network. In this fun and interactive workshop, you will explore specific scenarios you may be faced with as an instructor and develop strategies to help route students in a manner that is most beneficial to their success.


Wednesday, February 14th – 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

USING FLIPGRID TO CREATE PRESENCE IN AN ONLINE CLASS : COGNITIVE, SOCIAL, & INSTRUCTOR 

Oral Presentation

Dave Hallmon, Instructor, Math/Computer Science Dept.

The new online course, GLBC 1210: Gateway Seminar to the Global Citizenship Program, has been able to pilot the use of FlipGrid, a unique video discussion platform that offers innovative design and even more functionality than what is currently offered in Canvas. After the completion of the pilot there has been an estimated 25 hours of engagement between students through video. 
Of the 14 students in the class who have participated in 21 video threads in the course, there have been 185 video responses and 36 video replies. The 221 total videos (responses/replies by students) have been viewed 959 times by students. 
This presentation will discuss these learning analytics, demo the use of FlipGrid, showcase some student responses/replies, and consider the promotion of active learning. The three types of “presence” in an online course will also be discussed, e.g., social, cognitive, and instructor. 


Wednesday, February 14th – 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

THE WRITER’S SECRET: STORYTELLING AS METAPHOR AND MODEL FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

Workshop

Jeremy Dennis, Instructor, English Dept.

In Small Teaching, James Lang claims that dividing lessons into segments will make them more effective. These segments mirror the organizational strategies literary authors use for telling stories. Using narrative principles borrowed from thinkers across academic disciplines, participants will learn the instructional design strategies that promote creative thinking and the self-directed learning habits that are necessary for lifelong learning.


Wednesday, February 14th – 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Library eClassroom (Library 110)

TEACHING CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY WITH A LITTLE NUMBER CRUNCHING

Workshop

John Aleshunas, Professor, Math/Computer Science Dept.

Complex topics, like climate change policy, can often be better understood when students get experience with the underlying information and data supporting the policy. Practical exercises help students understand policy concepts and the reasons why these policies become politically complex. 
This presentation will demonstrate how experiential learning exercises can enhance student understanding of topics like climate change policy. It includes example exercises using free open-source tools that can facilitate analysis and visualization and data freely available from reliable Internet sources. These tools and data provide an environment where students can easily conduct experiments and analysis using pre-prepared scripts, allowing them to discover for themselves the complexities behind policy issues. This methodology can increase the understanding and impact of course content.


Thursday, February 15th – 8:00 AM – 2:00 PM
East Academic Building, Room 137

YOU: TEACHING VIA WEBNET+

Walk-in workshop (stop by anytime)

Tyann Cherry, Manager, Operations & Faculty Support, Online Learning Center
Beth Fiock, Representative, Online Learning Center
Kevin Gitonga, Manager, Training & Instructional Design, Online Learning Center
Sarah Kuehnle, Instructional Designer, Online Learning Center
Susan Schultz, Director, Scott Air Force Base

Did you know that WebNet+ credit hour production has more than tripled since its formalized beginning in Fall 2015? Did you know that WebNet+ has connected courses between Webster Groves, Leiden, and Geneva while also including a cohort of 19 online students for a fully immersive, 21st-century learning experience? Have you ever wondered what it might be like to teach one of these courses? Are you thinking of having your department leverage this technology across the network? Stop by EAB 137 and EAB 210 and see what it's like to teach a WebNet+ course. Participants will have the chance to complete every aspect of WebNet+ teaching, from login to class ending. Participants will also be provided with a quick demo of our top five "WebNet+ Best Practices" based on the experience of our more than 200 faculty that have taught a course using this delivery method.


Thursday, February 15th – 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM
East Academic Building, Room 102

FACULTY RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

Office of the Provost, Office of Research & Sponsored Programs, Faculty Development Center, and Webster University Library present the 2nd Annual Faculty Research Symposium. Please join us in room 102 for 45-minute sessions during the day. A reception in room 253 with light refreshments will follow from 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm.


Friday, February 16th – 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Faculty Development Center (Library 420)

MOTIVATING THE FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE: PERSISTENCE THROUGH TRANSPARENCY

Panel Presentation

Justin Barton, Director, First Year Experience and Undergraduate Persistence
Carolyn Brown, Writing Center and Plagiarism Prevention Program Coordinator, Academic Resource Center
Emily Scharf, Head of Research Services, Library
Vanika Spencer, Coordinator, First Year Experience & Undergraduate Persistence
Panel of Webster students:
Kimberly Cedillo, class of 2018, International Studies, Spanish, and Japanese Major
Travis Haughton, class of 2021, Film, Television, and Video Production Major
Olivia Renkins, class of 2018, Biology and Education Major

What does it mean to be a first-year student at Webster? With so many first-year initiatives, how do you know where to refer your students? This panel of students, faculty, and staff will discuss first-year initiatives, the needs of new students, and the programs available to assist during the process of transition. We will discuss the high-impact practices and retention initiatives from Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, and beyond. Participants will hear student experiences regarding what it is like to be new to Webster and the college classroom and community. Additionally, faculty and staff will speak toward interacting and utilizing initiatives to motivate and support new students toward persistence.