Presentations | Webster University

Presentations at the 2019 Teaching Festival

 


Tuesday, February 12th – 9:00 AM – 9:30 AM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

ACTIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES WITH ANNOTATION, NOTE-TAKING, AND FLASH CARDS

Presentation

Rena Rockwell, Lecturer, Dept. of Teacher Education

This session will demonstrate how students can engage in active learning strategies to:

  • Create frequent checks for comprehension and overall understanding of course material
  • Promote independent study materials
  • Build personal accountability for learning

Whether you are using textbooks, online resources, lecture, and/or media in the classroom these strategies can help your on-ground and online students comprehend and apply the materials you have provided them.


Tuesday, February 12th – 9:30 AM – 10:00 AM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

CREATIVE STRATEGIES TO INCREASE STUDENT LEARNING & ENGAGEMENT

Presentation

Kathleen Young, Instructor, Dept. of Management

This session highlights seven active learning strategies and two assessment vehicles. The seven active learning strategies are:

  • One-minute paper
  • Simulation
  • Games to teach theory
  • Ping pong balls to teach theory
  • Team-based learning discussion groups
  • Ring the bell reviews
  • Student-led presentations.

As an adjunct instructor of economics, I am often at the front of the classroom looking at students that have worked a full day on the job, have kids waiting for them at home, and are not that excited to learn about economics. These students also have differing experiences in educational background and achievements. Many (not all) arrive in the classroom with a “sit and get” mentality. To bridge these gaps, I utilize a series of active learning strategies in the classroom to create an engaging, fun environment that fosters outstanding discussion, higher-level thinking, and retention of content. My goal is to make each student a fully engaged learner.

Does this approach work? I utilize two assessment vehicles that allow me to gauge effectiveness and adjust the course activities if necessary. The vehicles are a yellow card activity and a mid-course survey. The mid-course survey usually results in an overall 90% response rate. Students often say: “I learned so much in this course and enjoyed it!”


Tuesday, February 12th – 10:00 PM – 10:30 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

STUDENT GENERATED PRACTICE TEST QUESTIONS: DOES QUANTITY MATTER?

Presentation

Heather Mitchell, Associate Professor, Dept. of Psychology

Students may be in need of more critical thinking or metacognitive skills necessary for college success. The current research investigated students’ use of practice testing to increase understanding of psychological concepts in introductory and upper level psychology courses.  All students in a General Psychology and an Applied Learning course had the opportunity to participate in this study. Participants used 50-minute classes to create practice test questions for each exam. These questions were used to create practice tests provided to all students. Students were encouraged to take and use the practice test as they studied for the upcoming exam.

The practice exams varied in length and style because of the bottom up approach used in their creation. Practice tests with fewer questions generally led to better exam scores. Specifically, Exam 2 practice test in general psychology contained 58 questions, and the Exam 2 average test score (M =79.46 (SD = 10.55) was significantly better than the exam 1 average score (M= 71.52, SD= 11.78). Additionally,  Psyc 3325 Exam 3 practice test contained 40 questions, and the Exam 3 average test score (M =88.8 (SD = 8.53) was significantly better than the exam 1 average score (M= 79.8, SD= 11.42).


Tuesday, February 12th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

STUDENT VIEWS ON EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

Presentation

Terri Reilly, Adjunct Full Professor, College of Fine Arts

This presentation will be a combination of research findings and suggestions on “best practices” that could result in more effective learning environments as well as aid in retention. Attendees will be invited to share their classroom experiences during the session. Students surveyed answered questions such as:

1. What motivates you in the classroom to want to learn?

2. Describe three qualities of a teacher who you thought was effective in motivating you to learn.

3. What do teachers misunderstand about you as a learner?


Tuesday, February 12th – 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

OUTSIDE THE BOX: STUDENT-LED EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING AT WEBSTER

Panel Presentation

Karla Armbruster, Professor, Dept. of English
Rea Bedalli, Student in Psychology and Advertising
Joshua Krakos, Student in Philosophy
Matt West, Student in Education

Webster students have numerous opportunities for experiential learning within our curricula, but some students seek out even more chances to learn beyond the classroom. How can we help increase all Webster students’ access to experiential opportunities (from study abroad to internships), and how can we support students who crave unique or individual learning prospects, locally or globally? This session features a conversation with current Webster students who have sought out exciting experiential projects. Participants will have the chance to learn about these students’ experiences, hear about the barriers they think Webster students face in seeking out experiential opportunities, and to learn about what faculty and staff can do to help more students access such projects.


Tuesday, February 12th – 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Active Learning Classroom (Sverdrup 119)

ACTIVE LEARNING OPEN LAB

Erik Palmore, Director, Faculty Development Center
Elvir Mandzukic, Coordinator, Faculty Development Center

Drop in to work with FDC staff on questions and ideas about your class.  Come with any topic in mind, such as developing a class or assignment, using university technology, or learning strategies to engage students in the classroom.


Thursday, February 14th – 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

TELLING STORIES OF OUR WORK ALONG THE U.S. BORDER

Panel Presentation

Mary Ann Drake, Professor, Dept. of Nursing
Anne Geraghty-Rathert, Professor, Dept. of Legal Studies
Silvia Navia, Professor of Spanish
Cathy Periandri, Student in Nursing

This session features a panel discussion between faculty and one of the undergraduate students who went on a service trip to Alamo, Texas over fall break. Following changes this summer in the U.S. family separation policy along the U.S/Mexico border, a program (ARISE) was identified for a service trip. ARISE was founded 30 years ago by a Mercy Sister and focused on empowerment of women living in the colonias along the U.S.-Mexico border. Following an August trip, Mary Ann returned with hopes of another trip. Over fall break, three faculty (plus retired faculty member Anne Schappe) and 6 undergraduate students (4 in Nursing and 2 Journalism students, one with a double major in Spanish) travelled to south Texas. We spent four days working along the Mexican border. We offered assistance in requested areas of need: Anne focused on immigration concerns and training to increase interviewers for asylum applications; the nurses offered health screenings, health education, and consulted on current health services; Silvia helped everyone with translation.
Another trip is being planned over spring break with faculty/students in International Languages and Cultures, Legal Studies, and Nursing.


Thursday, February 14th – 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

UNIVERSITY TRANSFORMATION WITH STUDENT SUCCESS DATA

Presentation

Erica Ellard, Director, Academic Resource Center
Kyle McCool, Director, Graduate Advising
Erik Palmore, Director, Faculty Development Center

In this session, you will learn about Webster’s progress with the Student Success Portal, powered by Starfish, and what we’re learning based on faculty responses and the analytic dashboards. Come and learn which students are most likely to leave the institution and what we can to do to retain these students. Student success data is painting a clearer picture of areas that can be strengthened through actions to positively improve student completion.


Thursday, February 14th – 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Library Conference Room (Library 120)

PRONOUNS IN THE CLASSROOM: NAVIGATING TRANS* AND NON-BINARY STUDENT NEEDS

Panel Presentation

Chester Bacon, Webster University Student
Jai Bollan, Webster University Student
Amanda Kracen, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Psychology
Elliot Laurence, Webster University Student
Danielle MacCartney, Associate Professor, Dept. of Anthropology & Sociology
Kel MacLauchlin, Webster University Student
Candace Mothersbaugh, Webster University Student

Kate Parsons, Professor, Dept. of Philosophy
Julie Setele, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Anthropology & Sociology

The first day of class, whether online or face-to-face, can set the tone for how inclusive and safe the classroom atmosphere feels for trans* and/or non-binary students. Pronoun usage is changing, so figuring out how to address and refer to students in a respectful manner can be a challenge. In this panel discussion, with students and faculty members from the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program, we will discuss several approaches to guiding inclusive classroom interactions, including how to handle first-day introductions and how to navigate the moments when we and/or other students misgender our students.