Creating an Email Signature

All Webster University business collateral — letterhead, envelopes, business cards, etc. — uphold an identity standard that promotes brand consistency. Why should email be any different?

If email is sent via webster.edu, it represents the University. Uniform email signatures present a professional image while still providing brand consistency across University departments, colleges, schools and campus locations.

A professional email signature isn't the place to offer inspirational quotes or try out colorful designs with fun, new fonts. Ultimately, a signature exists to answer three questions: Who are you? Where are you from? How do I reach you?

In an effort to help University faculty and staff present a more consistent brand via email, Global Marketing and Communications offers the following guidelines:

Be Concise

An email signature need not be longer than the email itself. Let less be more. The recommended signature fits on four lines and should never go more than six. Go wider rather than longer, and use pipes to separate components.

Make sure to include your name, Webster University, your title and the best method for getting in touch with you.

There is no need to include your email address in your signature since it's just as easy to click “reply.” And while random quotes are fun among friends, they can risk offending business associations that may not share the same points of inspiration.

Drop the Images

An image only increases the email's file size and may be blocked before it's opened. Most email clients store images as attachments or block them altogether, meaning the recipient will have to guess if it's a genuine attachment or not.

Different email clients process images in different ways and there's no way to ensure the image will correctly appear across the board, even if it's the University logo. When compounded, images hinder delivery performance and increase storage quotas. In short, drop the images.

Forget Fun Fonts

Standard-sized fonts, black in color, are one of the only ways to ensure a signature will appear the same regardless of the client each recipient uses.

Stay away from big, tiny, or rainbow-colored fonts. Simple fonts are easier to read on computer monitors and mobile devices than more complex script and cursive fonts.

Check the Rules

There are some countries with specific rules for what information needs to appear in an email signature. Most often these rules require a company name, registration number and place of registration. Check with the country where you are located to see if these rules apply.

Follow Examples


John Smith
Director of Digital Marketing and Communications
Webster University | 470 E. Lockwood Ave. | St. Louis, MO 63119
Office: 314-555-5555 | Mobile: 314-555-5555


Jane Doe
Community Relations Coordinator
Webster University | 4414 SW College Road, Suite #942 | Ocala, FL 34474
Office: 479-555-5555 | Mobile: 314-555-5555


Joe Smith, PhD
Professor, School of Communications
Webster University | 470 E. Lockwood Ave. | St. Louis, MO 63119
Office: 314-555-5555 | Mobile: 314-555-5555


Jane Doe, PhD
Administrative Assistant, George Herbert Walker School of Business & Technology
Webster University | 470 E. Lockwood Ave. | St. Louis, MO 63119
Office: 314-555-5555 | Mobile: 314-555-5555


(Name)
(Job Title), (School or College, if applicable)
Webster University | (Local Street Address) | (City, State, ZIP)
Office: (XXX-XXX-XXXX) | Mobile: (XXX-XXX-XXXX)

/globalmarketingcommunications/digital/email/
/globalmarketingcommunications/digital/email/