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APPLIED RESEARCH

EPSY 5800


BERNEY J WILKINSON, PH.D.

BWILKINSON04@WEBSTER.EDU

(863) 860-2817

TBA


DESCRIPTION


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This is an introductory course in educational research methodology, wherein basic concepts of research design, strategies of qualitative and quantitative research, and basic statistical procedures are introduced. This course enables students to read, interpret, and evaluate educational and psychological research and to plan research.

Students will learn to analyze the purposes and requirements of designing and developing a proposal for a research study and become familiar with Webster University’s IRB.


LEARNING OUTCOMES


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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand basic information about purposes of research, the scientific method, various approaches to conducting research, and considerations when designing and implementing research investigations.

  2. Locate, analyze, and evaluate professional literature.

  3. Consider issues of ethical treatment and protection of human subjects and prepare a proposal that is approvable by the Webster University Institutional Review Board (IRB).

  4. Describe what statistics are and what are they used for by researchers.

  5. Design a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed method research study and prepare a proposal for the study.


    MATERIALS


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    Required texts (you must purchase these texts for the course):

    Drew, C.J., Hardman, M.L., & Hosp, J.L. (2008). Designing and Conducting Research in Education. Thousand Oaks, C: Sage. ISBN: 978-1412960748

    Dinella, L.M. (Ed.). (2009). Conducting science-based research in schools. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. ISBN: 978-1433804687

    American Psychological Association (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.).

    Washington DC.

    Supplemental texts (you do not have to purchase these texts, though you may find them useful):

    Ary, D., Jacobs, L.C., Sorenson, C., & Razavieh, A. (2010). Introduction to research in education (8th ed.). Belmont CA: Wadsworth.

    Bai, H.W., Wang, L., Pan, W., & Frey, M. (2009). Measuring mathematics anxiety: Psychometric analysis of a bidimensional affective scale. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 36(3), pp. 185-193.

    Graduate Thesis Requirements for Applied Educational Psychology

    Subotnik, R., & Thompson, B. (2010). Introduction: A promising future for research in gifted education. In Subotnik, R., & Thompson, B. (Ed.), Methodologies for conducting research on giftedness. Washington DC: APA.


    OUTCOMES



    Course Outcomes

    SoE Goals, SoE Dispositions, DESE School Psychologist Competencies, ISPA Goals, NAGC/CEC Standard


    1. Understand basic information about purposes of research, the scientific method, various approaches to conducting research, and considerations when designing and implementing research investigations.

    NCATE: 1c

    SoE Goals: 1.1

    SoE Dispositions: 3.1, 3.2, 3.4

    DESE School Psychologist: Research and Program Evaluation

    ISPA Goals: Research Methods and Statistical Skills

    NAGC/CEC: Differences, Research, Inquiry


    2. Locate, analyze, and evaluate professional literature.

    NCATE: 1c

    SoE Goals: 1.1

    SoE Dispositions: 3.1, 3.2, 3.4

    DESE School Psychologist: Research and Program Evaluation

    ISPA Goals: Research Methods and Statistical Skills

    NAGC/CEC: Differences, Research, Inquiry


    3. Consider issues of ethical treatment and protection of human subjects and prepare a proposal that is approvable by the Webster University Institutional Review Board (IRB).

    NCATE: 1c

    SoE Goals: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

    SoE Dispositions: 3.1, 3.2, 3.4

    DESE School Psychologist: Ethical Practice ISPA Goals: Knowledge of ethics NAGC/CEC: Ethical Practice


    4. Describe what statistics are and what are they used for by researchers.

    NCATE: 1c

    SoE Goals: 1.1

    SoE Dispositions: 3.1, 3.2, 3.4

    DESE School Psychologist: Research and Program Evaluation

    ISPA Goals: Research Methods and Statistical Skills

    NAGC/CEC: Differences, Research, Inquiry


    5. Design a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed method research study and prepare a proposal for the study.


    NCATE: 1c

    SoE Goals: 1.1

    SoE Dispositions: 3.1, 3.2, 3.4

    DESE School Psychologist: Research and Program Evaluation

    ISPA Goals: Research Methods and Statistical Skills

    NAGC/CEC: Differences, Research, Inquiry

    DELIVERABLES


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    Midterm and final exams

    There will be a brief review for each exam. Make note that exams will cover text content, details of which will not necessarily have been reviewed in class. Students are responsible for understanding all chapter content not just that discussed in class. Class discussions provide the opportunity to ask questions and gain understanding. Exams will be multiple choice. Each exam is 100 points for a total of 200 pts possible on exams.

    Research Proposal

    You will create a research proposal on a topic that interests you personally or professionally. The proposal will be written in future tense and will not include any results since it is just a proposal. It will be written in APA 6th edition format. It will include a Title page, Abstract, Table of Contents, Body of paper (Chapters), and References. You will have at least 6 references.

    The following sections will be included in your proposal:

    Chapter I: The Problem (This section will be about 1-2 pages.) Introduction to the topic

    Importance of the study

    Research Question (Quant)/Purpose (Qual)

    Chapter II: Review of the Related Literature (This section should be about 2 pages.) You will provide a review of the literature on the area of research.

    Chapter III: Methodology (This section should be about 5-7 pages). You will choose either a qualitative or quantitative design.

    We will discuss this assignment in more detail on the first night of class.

    Journal Article Review

    You will be assigned peer-reviewed journal article and provide a critical review for the class. Your presentation must be professionally done and well organized. You must demonstrate at least a basic understanding of the contents of the article.

    You will examine ALL of the following in your analysis:

IRB Training

An important aspect of conducting research is understanding how such research may affect human rights. Though risk is not always foreseeable, researchers are obligated to consider all possible affects participation in a research project may have on participants. To gain an appreciation of this critical process, you will complete the online IRB training offered by NIH. Go to http://webster.edu/irb and read through the site. On the left, there is a link entitled Training Program (http://www.webster.edu/irb/training.html). Click on that link and follow the directions for taking the NIH Research Training Program. The program takes a few hours to complete, so make sure that you plan accordingly. You will receive full credit for this assignment by turning in the Certificate of Completion awarded to you at the end of the program. The Certificate should be turned in by the last night of class.

Class Participation and Attendance

Note that participation includes being present in class in addition to speaking in every class session. Your comments evidence your reading. Participate. Note also that it is possible to attend all class sessions but receive a significantly lowered grade if your skills are not developing, and or you are not actively speaking in class.

You may evidence competent skills but lack of participation, attendance, and or reading may fail you. Participation in all class sessions is critical considering the accelerated format of this program and the fact that counseling is an inter-relational profession. Participation will include participation in all online activities, including discussions and other activities. Absences and lack of speaking in class will affect your final grade. There are no “excused” absences.

EVALUATION


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Criteria

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Type Weight

Midterm exam 100 pts

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Final exam 100 pts

Research Proposal 100 pts

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Journal Article Review 100 pts

IRB Training 100 pts

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Participation 100 pts

Total 600 pts

Passing= 480 points or 80%

Breakdown

Grade Range


A

90-100

B


C

80-89


70-79

F

69 or less


COURSE POLICIES


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EXPECTATIONS FOR WRITING COMPETENCY

Note that writing competency is important in graduate school. The grade penalty is heavy for lack of simple proofing of grammar and spelling on all assignments. As a graduate student and counselor-in-training, you have a responsibility to the profession and those you will be representing to write professionally. Take this task seriously and consult with the Academic Resource Center for assistance if needed.


Subjective aspect of grading

The grading of this course has a subjective component to it based upon the professional experience of the instructor. The Counseling faculty recognize that counseling skills and counselor effectiveness cannot be assessed in the same manner as academic performance in typical university coursework. Students completing this course should demonstrate marked progress toward the course objectives as noted above as well as be able to write coherently about counseling theories and techniques. Your final grade in this course will reflect not only your academic performance but also your counseling and interpersonal skill development as evaluated by the instructor. For example, it is possible to excel academically and receive a final grade less than an A or

  1. Thus, all grades will reflect a combination of objective and subjective assessment.


    Self-awareness, safety of disclosure, appropriate interpersonal skills and ACA Code of Ethics

    In the interaction between class members, self-disclosure and personal examination will occur. All interactions fall under the same umbrella of confidentiality as do client/counselor relationships, i.e., what is discussed in the class stays in the class and is not discussed with other students outside of the course or friends. Any violations of the ethical standards will be dealt with accordingly. Maintaining confidentiality is the primary ethical principle of counselors. If a student fails to maintain the confidentiality of clients or classmates, the student risks a failing grade in the course. In addition, the instructor will refer the breach of confidentiality to the Counseling Advisory Committee for disciplinary action of the student.

    We will be learning from each other in addition to the text throughout the semester. Therefore, it is important that everyone feels safe, comfortable, and free to discuss and elaborate on their thoughts around their developing knowledge and skills. In class, it is important for each of us to be respectful of one another’s

    positions; relating to others in an empathic manner occurs in class just as with clients. You are encouraged to make your feelings and thoughts known, yet, to do so in a “counselor manner”, i.e., respecting the position of listener while giving voice to your thoughts and using your budding counselor attending skills. This is an opportunity for you to practice and evidence your basic skills of empathy, warmth, genuineness, and congruence by communicating in a manner consistent with a good counselor. The building of trusting alliances with your classmates is as important as doing so with your clients. Therefore, you will be practicing some of the same skills when participating in class as in counseling sessions with your clients one day.

    Further, openness to supervision and instruction by the instructor can become an issue for some students and is, therefore, emphasized here. Openness to supervision is defined as: accepting supervision—both individual and in class; recognizing your own personal strengths, weaknesses, biases, needs, and beliefs; sensing personal and professional impact on others, both positive and negative; accepting and applying feedback from instructor; seeking out needed experiences, feedback, etc., in a proactive way; and accepting feedback in a non-defensive manner with a professional attitude.

    Students who do not evidence openness to supervision and or appropriate interpersonal skills are subject to remediation by the Counseling Advisory Committee at the campus. See the student handbook and or catalog for further detail.

    ACA Code of Ethics (2014)

    Counselors-in-training have a responsibility to understand and follow the ACA Code of Ethics and adhere to applicable laws, regulatory policies, and rules and policies governing professional staff behavior at the agency or placement setting. Students have the same obligation to clients as those required of professional counselors.

    (See C.1., H.1.)


    INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES


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    Academic Policies

    Academic policies provide students with important rights and responsibilities. Students are expected to familiarize themselves with all academic policies that apply to them. Academic policies for undergraduate students can be found in the Undergraduate Studies Catalog; graduate students should review the Graduate Studies Catalog.

    Undergraduate Studies Catalog

    The Undergraduate Studies Catalog contains academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students.

    The academic policies and information section of the catalog contains important information related

    to attendance, conduct, academic honesty, grades, and more. If you are an undergraduate student, please review the catalog each academic year. The current Undergraduate Studies Catalog is at:

    http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/ Graduate Studies Catalog

    The Graduate Studies Catalog contains academic policies that apply to all graduate students. The academic policies section of the catalog contains important information related to conduct, academic honesty, grades, and more. If you are a graduate student, please review the catalog each academic year. The current Graduate Studies Catalog is at:

    http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/


    Grading

    The Grades section of the academic catalog outlines the various grading systems courses may use, including the information about the final grade reported for this class.

    Undergraduate

    http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/academic-policies.html#grading

    Graduate

    http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/academic-policies.html#grades Incomplete

    There are important policies that govern grades of Incomplete (I), including the circumstances under which Incomplete grades are granted, deadlines for completion, and consequences should the remaining course work not be completed. It is the responsibility of a student who requests an Incomplete to ensure that he/she understands and follows the policies.

    Grade Appeals

    Instructors are responsible for assigning grades, and student should discuss grade issues with the instructor. Policies and procedures for appealing grades are available in the appropriate catalog.


    Academic Honesty Policy

    Webster University is committed to academic excellence. As part of our Statement of Ethics, we strive to preserve academic honor and integrity by repudiating all forms of academic and intellectual dishonesty, including cheating, plagiarism and all other forms of academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty is unacceptable and is subject to a disciplinary response. Students are encouraged to talk to instructors about any questions they may have regarding how to properly credit others’ work, including paraphrasing, quoting, and citation formatting. The university reserves the right to utilize electronic databases, such as Turnitin.com, to assist faculty and students with their academic work.

    The University’s Academic Honesty Policy is published in academic catalogs:

    Undergraduate

    http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/academic-policies.html

    Graduate

    http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/academic-policies.html

    As a part of the University commitment to academic excellence, the Academic Resource Center provides student resources to become better acquainted with academic honesty and the tools to prevent plagiarism in its many forms:

    http://www.webster.edu/arc/plagiarism_prevention/


    Statement of Ethics

    Webster University strives to be a center of academic excellence. The University makes every effort to ensure the following:


To review Webster University's statement of ethics, see the Undergraduate Studies Catalog and the Graduate and Studies Catalog:

Undergraduate

http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/overview.html#ethics

Graduate

http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/ethics.html


Important Academic Resources

Academic Accommodations

Webster University makes every effort to accommodate individuals with academic/learning, health, physical and psychological disabilities. To obtain accommodations, students must identify themselves and provide documentation from a qualified professional or agency to the appropriate campus designee or the ADA Coordinator at the main campus. The ADA Coordinator may be reached at 314-246-7700

or disability@webster.edu.

If you have already identified as a student with a documented disability and are entitled to classroom or testing accommodations, please inform the instructor of the accommodations you will require for this class at the beginning of the course.

Academic Resource Center

Additional support and resources may be accessed through the Academic Resource Center (ARC). Support and resources include academic counseling, accommodations, assistive technology, peer tutoring, plagiarism prevention, testing center services, and writing coaching. Visit www.webster.edu/arc or Loretto Hall 40 on the main campus for more information.

University Library

Webster University Library is dedicated to supporting the research needs and intellectual pursuits of students throughout the University’s worldwide network. Resources include print and electronic books, journal articles, online databases, DVDs and streaming video, CDs and streaming music, datasets, and other specialized information. Services include providing materials at no cost and research help for basic questions to in-depth exploration of resources. The gateway to all of these resources and services is http://library.webster.edu. For support navigating the library’s resources, see http://libanswers.webster.edu/ for ways to contact library staff.


Drops and Withdrawals

Drop and withdrawal policies dictate processes for students who wish to unenroll from a course. Students must take proactive steps to unenroll; informing the instructor is not sufficient, nor is failing to attend. In the early days of the term or semester, students may DROP a course with no notation on their student record. After the DROP deadline, students may WITHDRAW from a course; in the case of a WITHDRAW, a grade of W appears on the student record. After the WITHDRAW deadline, students may not unenroll from a

course. Policies and a calendar of deadlines for DROP and WITHDRAW are at:

Undergraduate

http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/enrollment.html

Graduate

http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/enrollment.html Academic Calendar - http://www.webster.edu/academics/academic-calendar/

Current tuition rates, policies, and procedures, including details of pro-rated tuition refunds, are available in the “Tuition, Fees, and Refunds” section of Webster’s Academic Catalogs:

Undergraduate http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/undergraduate-catalog/tuition.html

Graduate http://www.webster.edu/catalog/current/graduate-catalog/tuition.html


Student Handbook and Other Important Policies

Student handbook and other non-academic policies may apply to you and may impact your experience in this class. Such policies include the student code of conduct, privacy, technology and communications, and more. Please review the handbook each year and be aware of policies that apply to you. The handbook is available at:

http://www.webster.edu/student-handbook/

Sexual Assault, Harassment, and Other Sexual Offenses

Webster University makes every effort to educate the community to prevent sexual assault, harassment, and other sexual offenses from occurring, and is committed to providing support to those affected when this behavior does occur. To access information and resources or to review the Policy on Sexual Assault, Harassment, and Other Sexual Offenses, visit:

http://www.webster.edu/sexual-misconduct/


Research on Human Subjects

The Webster University Institutional Review Committee (IRB) is responsible for the review of all research on human subjects. The IRB process applies to all Webster University faculty, staff, and students and must be completed prior to any contact with human subjects. For more information on the IRB, visit:

http://www.webster.edu/irb/index.html


Course Evaluations

At the end of this course, you will have the opportunity to provide feedback about your experience. Your input is extremely valuable to the university, your instructor, and the department that offers this course. Please provide your honest and thoughtful evaluation, as it helps the university to provide the best experience possible for all of its students.


Important Technology Information

Connections Accounts

Webster University provides all students, faculty, and staff with a University email account through Connections. Students are expected to activate their Connections account and regularly check incoming

University email. Students may choose to have their University email forwarded to an alternate email address. Connections account holders can call the Help Desk (314-246-5995 or toll free at 1-866-435-7270) for assistance with this setup. Instructions are also provided on the Information Technology website at:

http://www.webster.edu/technology/service-desk/ WorldClassRoom

WorldClassRoom is Webster’s Learning Content Management System (LMS). Your instructor may use WorldClassRoom to deliver important information, to hold class activities, to communicate grades and feedback, and more. WorldClassRoom is available using your Connections ID at:

https://worldclassroom.webster.edu/ Webster Alerts

Webster Alerts is the University's preferred emergency mass notification service, available free to current students, faculty and staff at all US campuses. By registering a valid cell phone number and email address, you will receive urgent campus text, voice mail and email communications. Valuable information concerning a range of incidents affecting you - from weather-related campus closures, class delays and cancellations, to more serious or life-threatening events - are immediately and simultaneously delivered through multiple communication channels. To register for Webster Alerts, visit: http://www.webster.edu/technology/services/webster-alerts/

SCHEDULE

When

Topic

Notes

Week 1

  • Drew, Hardman, & Hosp, Ch 1

  • Dinella, Ch 1

  • Review IRB link on WU site (webster.edu/irb)

Assignments and activities: Divide into groups and identify topic for proposal.

Week 2

  • Drew, Hardman, & Hosp, Ch 2

Assignments and activities: Proposal Topic Finalized and Approved.

Week 3

  • Drew, Hardman, & Hosp, Ch 3

  • Dinella, Ch 2

Assignments and activities: Proposal Chapter 1 draft completed.

Week 4

  • Drew, Hardman, & Hosp, Chs 4 & 5

  • Dinella, Ch 5

Assignments and activities: Continue working on Proposal Chapter 2.

Week 5

  • Midterm Exam (100 pts.)

  • Drew, Hardman, & Hosp, Chs 6 & 8

Assignments and activities: Proposal Chapter 2 draft completed.

Week 6

  • Drew, Hardman, & Hosp, Chs 10, 12 & 13

Assignments and activities: Continue working on Proposal Chapter 3.

Presentations

When

Topic

Notes

Week 7

  • Drew, Hardman, & Hosp, Ch 15

Assignments and activities: Continue working on Proposal Chapter 3.


Presentations

Week 8

  • Dinella, Ch 8

Assignments and activities: Continue working on Proposal Chapter 3.

Presentations

Week 9

  • Final Exam

Research Proposal Due Journal Article Review Due IRB Training Certificate Due

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