Research Across Disciplines: Fall 2016 Conference


Conference Overview

Friday, December 9

8 a.m - 2 p.m.

  • 8:00 a.m. Breakfast & Registration
    1st Floor Lobby
  • 9:00 a.m. Opening Remarks
    1st Floor Lobby
  • 9:15 a.m. Oral Presentation Session I
    Rooms 133 & 154
  • 10:00 a.m. First Year Experience Showcase
    Room 261
  • 10:45 a.m. Oral Presentation Session II
    Rooms 137 & 154
  • 12:00 p.m. Lunch Break
  • 1:00 p.m. Oral Presentation Session III 
    Room 133
  • 1:00 p.m. First Year Experience Showcase
    Room 261

Saturday, December 10

8 a.m. - Noon

  • 8:00 a.m. Breakfast & Registration
    1st Floor Lobby
  • 9:00 a.m. Opening Remarks
    1st Floor Lobby
  • 9:15 a.m. Oral Presentation Session IV
    Rooms 133, 137 & 154
  • 9:15 a.m. First Year Experience Showcase
    Room 261
  • 10:45 a.m. Poster Presentation Session
    Room 253/262

Concurrent Sessions

Master of Science in Nursing Student Presentations

Wednesday-Thursday, December 7-8
5 p.m.-8 p.m.
Library Conference Room, First Floor

Students present culminating work towards their MSN degrees.

Presenters include Jennifer Aycock, Emily Berghult, Marsha Boschert, Teresa Brassfield, Krista O’Brien, Helen Cassidy, Mary Clark, Elaine Figueroa, Alicia Gardner, Barbara Garrison, Jacqueline Graham, Michele Herndon, Demetrius Leonard, Rachel Little, Elizabeth Marques, Raven Martin, Jamie McCoy, Meredith Meyer, Jennifer Mitchell, Jill Mueller, Zainab Oyebamiji, Kristin Piskulich, Altisa Rios, Mary Ann Signaigo, Melissa Smith, Mariann Spears, Tim Swain, Carol Vance, Holly Wamser, Becky Wyant, Tiffany Zeman

 

Faculty Research Symposium

Thursday, December 8
2:00 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
East Academic Building, Rms. 102, 253, and 262
A stimulating look at the research being conducted by Webster University faculty related to the Office of the Provost and Office of Academic Affairs Faculty Research Grants, including presentations by faculty, followed by roundtable discussions and light refreshments. Presenters include Eric Goedereis, Ryann Gregg, Ryan Groeneman, Dan Hellinger, Heather Mitchell, Sheila Hwang, DJ Kaiser, and Julia Griffey. Roundtable discussion leaders include Gad Guterman, Herman Krueger, Chris Sagovac, Brenda Boyce, Tim Ryan, Carolyn Corley, Linda Dahlgren, and Kelly Young.
Visit library.webster.edu/services/facultysymposium.html for full details.


Presentation Schedule

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9

First Year Seminar Inquiry Showcase

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.,  1:00 - 2:00 p.m.
East Academic Building, Room 261

ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION I

9:15 - 10:35 a.m.
East Academic Building

Room  133

Men and Masculinities in Sports: The Impact of Masculinities on Team Success
Maxi Moss, Webster University

Adolescents and Altruism
Sarah Pringer, Webster University

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Academic Self-Efficacy in College Students
Rebecca Shuler, Webster University

The White Resistance Movement: Connection Between the Civil Rights Movement and Today’s Political Divide
Brenna Whitehurst, Saint Louis University
Lisa Camp, Webster University

Room  154

Unlikely Resource: Igniting The Role of Spirituality in Nursing Management
Zainab Oyebamiji, Webster University

Qing Court Women Costume Developing Process Under the Influence of Han Traditional Culture in the Beginning of Manchurian Ruling Period and the Impact of Western Ideology During the Late Qing Dynasty
Runze Cao, Webster University

Beneath the Death of Emma Bovary
Tianlin Li, Webster University

ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION II

10:45 a.m. - 12:05 p.m.
East Academic Building

Room  137

Re-examining the Cookie Cutter College Kid:  A Comparison of Student Populations
Sarah Kurzu, Webster University

Mindset and Motivation in Language Learning
Jackson Pierce, Webster University

Current Use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 
Julia Sader, Webster University Geneva (via teleconference)

Human Rights Violations and Corruption in Liberal and Socialist Societies: A Comparative Study between Chile and Venezuela
Valeria Veroes, Webster University Geneva (via teleconference)

Room 154

The Latent Narrative on Criminality in Alban Berg’s Wozzeck
Andrea Hunter, Webster University

The War on Drugs
Manuel  León Hoyos, Webster University

Disappearance of Palestinian Folk Art
Sajeda Issa, Webster University

An Enlightening Experiment in French Theatre: How Close-reading Can Enhance Your Engineering Skills
Charlotte Wester, Webster University

ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION III

1:00 - 2:00 p.m.
East Academic Building

Room 133

College Student Empathy Felt Towards Humans and Animals in Relation to Pet Ownership Status: A Quasi-Experiment
Sharalyn Fields, Webster University

Utilizing Social Support to Combat Stress in College Students
Alexandra Gill, Webster University

Paws and Effect: A Quasi-Experimental Examination of Pet Influence on Friendship and Workplace Attitudes
Madeline Kuklo, Webster University

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10

First Year Seminar Inquiry Showcase

9:15  - 11:45 a.m.
East Academic Building
Room 261

ORAL PRESENTATION SESSION IV

9:15 - 10:35 a.m.
East Academic Building

Room  133

Experiential Learning Through Field Based Coursework in Tidewater, Virginia and Beyond:What Does the Material and Social Culture Reveal About the Intersection of Lives From a Eurocentric, Native Peoples And African Slave Perspective?
Kevin Reichardt, Austin Dudley, Scott Vassalli, Katie Lade, and Cathlyn Claridge
Webster University

  • Part 1: How Does Colonial Era Agriculture, Architecture, and Religion Intertwine with Modern Day Practices?
  • Part 2: How Did Communication During the Colonial Period Impact Politics and Intelligence Gathering?

Personal Reflections on the Research Process: The Importance of Passion, Scientific Thinking, Collaboration, and Patience
Jennifer M. Pierce, Maria Escalona, Samra Sahbegovic, Kathryn Larimer, Centron Felder, and Ria Jackson
Webster University

Room 137

The Effect of Color and Verbal Information on Feelings in Humans: Self-report and raw affect
Laura Malik, Webster University Vienna (via teleconference)

Self-Referential Processing Elicited by Words: High Score on Self-Consciousness Correlates with Increased Self-Referential Brain Activity
Nikola Gojcaj, Webster University Vienna (via teleconference)

BREAKING: The Internet is Destroying Democracy! Share if You Agree!!!
Alison Langley, Webster University Online (via teleconference)

Room 154

Effects of Ingestion of vs. Exposure to Roundup Herbicide on Ant Behavior
Joe Elfrink and Krystal Meza, Webster University

Deconvoluting the Response to Common Herbicide Compounds in Pogonomyrmex Harvester Ants
Krystal Meza, Webster University

A Novel Ant Farm to Study Magnetoreception of Western Harvester Ants
Beltran Torres, Webster University

Thermal Expansion Within Hydrogen Bonded Co-crystals
Frank Verdu, Webster University

POSTER PRESENTATION SESSION

10:45 - 11:45 a.m.
East Academic Building
Room 253/262

The Antimicrobial Properties of Mr. Corbin’s Marinades
Jaden Bentley, Danelle Hale and Sami Sbei
Maryville University

Creative Display: The Cold War: An Inevitable “War”
Christian Hargas, Webster University

Synthesis and Characterization of ß-cyclodextrin Derivatives
Duaa Kuziez, Maryville University

Bioassay Guided Chemical Investigation of Nigella Sativa Seeds
Nawal Majid and Hadeya Farooq, Maryville University

Confirmatory Test for Saliva Using the ELISA Method for Identification of Statherin
Nicole Meister, Kayla Stehle and Stacy Donovan
Maryville University

“Oh My Goodness I’ve Found My Calling:” A Qualitative Study of Career Development of Psychologists Working in Cancer Care
Taylor Michl, Afton Nelson, and Hannah Rowald
Webster University

Isolation and Characterization of Novel Bacteriophage from Webster University campus
Kalah Collins, Justin Geringer, Katie Jerome, Dylan McDonald, Yalda Mohamed, Anaya Rhiney, Phillip Sansone, Dillon Burke, Josh Embry, Kayla Miller, AbdAllah Mitchell, Mary Preuss, and Stephanie Schroeder
Webster University

Genetic Identification of Fungal Samples from Select Missouri and Illinois Caves: Implications for the Distribution of Pseudogymnoascus destructans and White Nose Syndrome
Sandra Van Berkel, Maryville University


Abstracts

The Antimicrobial Properties of Mr. Corbin’s Marinades
Jaden Bentley, Danelle Hale, Sami Sbei
Maryville University
  Many commercial products make claims about keeping foods fresh, but few test those claims empirically. With this research, we tested the putative antimicrobial properties of one particular brand of marinade for meat. We used paper disc assays and measured zones of inhibition for Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli (two common foodborne pathogens). We examined 15 discs per species for each of three varieties of marinade along with a salt/vinegar control. Our results are currently being analyzed and we will discuss them in the context of microbial growth and food nutrition, handling and preservation.
Faculty Mentor: Gabriel Colbeck

Qing Court Women Costume Developing Process Under the Influence of Han Traditional Culture in the Beginning of Manchurian Ruling Period and the Impact of Western Ideology During the Late Qing Dynasty
Runze Cao
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  The research focus on the cultural identity of Qing women through the perspective of clothing transformation and applied the western cultural theory during the study. Manchu minority group, with its unique cultural background, after entering Shanhaiguan and taken over China, has experienced the cultural conflicts as well as the combination of both east and west. Clothing, as a symbol of Manchurian cultural identity also has its political, economical and social functions for the ruler to establish a multicultural dynasty. Women clothing, however, is another reflection of the cultural identity pursing under a male dominated society.
Faculty Mentor: Elsa Fan

Experiential Learning Through Field Based Coursework in Tidewater, Virginia and Beyond: What Does the Material and Social Culture Reveal About the Intersection of Lives From a Eurocentric, Native Peoples and African Slave Perspective? 
Cathlyn Claridge, Austin Dudley, Katie Lade, Kevin Reichardt, Scott Vassalli
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus

Part 1: How Does Colonial Era Agriculture, Architecture, and Religion Intertwine with Modern Day Practices?
  Witness college students ’ experiences in Tidewater, Virginia from different cultural aspects of the Colonial Era. Experience how religion ran its course from eighteenth and nineteenth-century America, setting the stage for religious freedom. Compare agricultural practices and how farming became the vast industry we know today. Analyze architectural structures and commonalities from past designs and how our homes reflect past traditions. Explore how the effects of living history in Tidewater, Virginia impacted three Webster University undergraduate students. 
Cathlyn Claridge: How did religion in 17th and 18th century Virginia impact society?
Austin Dudley: Which 18th century agricultural practices could be sustainable in today’s world?
Katie Lade: Which architectural elements from Tidewater, Virginia have stood the test of time?

Part 2: How Did Communication During the Colonial Period Impact Politics and Intelligence Gathering?
  The influence of technology has evolved how we communicate and how we obtain information since the Colonial times. By obtaining information from the past, we can appreciate and reflect on how we communicate and receive information in the present and the foreseeable future. Through experience based research at Williamsburg, VA and personal interactions as a former service member, we explore how the Colonial Era influenced our modern-day attempt to communicate and gather information. Although new technology has influenced how we receive information, the Colonial Era still reflects the American way of innovation and power. 
Kevin Reichard: How was communication in 18th Century Virginia used to inform, inspire and interrogate citizens?
Scott Vassalli: Military intelligence with the Commander in Chief: The man or the myth?
Faculty Mentor: Ted Green

Isolation and Characterization of Novel Bacteriophage from Webster University campus
Kalah Collins, Justin Geringer, Katie Jerome, Dylan McDonald, Yalda Mohamed, Anaya Rhiney, Phillip Sansone, Dillon Burke, Josh Embry, Kayla Miller, AbdAllah Mitchell, Mary Preuss, and Stephanie Schroeder
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  In our Phage Discovery class, students worked to isolate and characterize novel bacteriophage from Webster University’s campus.  Bacteriophage capable of infecting the host Mycobacterium smegmatis, a common soil bacterium, were identified through plaque assays.  Following purification and amplification, the bacteriophage were imaged using transmission electron microscopy. Isolation of DNA from the phages allowed for restriction digest analyses to characterize the phage genomes. The next step is to sequence the phage genomes to see what kinds of genes are present and better understand phage genetics. Overall these studies help to further our understanding of bacteriophage-host interactions within the environment. This work is part of the larger SEA-PHAGES research program supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).
Faculty Mentor: Stephanie Schroeder

Effects of Ingestion of vs. Exposure to Roundup Herbicide on Ant Behavior
Joe Elfrink, Krystal Meza
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  Our lab has data showing RoundUp ‘Weed and Grass Concentrate Plus’, a widely used herbicide available at garden stores, is not lethal to ants, but it completely inhibits the instinctual tunneling behavior of ants, as seen in gel ant farm habitats. We characterized the dose-response curves for this effect and found Roundup inhibits digging behavior even at minute concentrations of the herbicide in the gel. In contrast to the gel habitats, where ants both tunnel through and feed upon the media, in sand-based habitats, the exposure is primarily external, and the herbicide is not directly ingested. We hypothesized that Roundup contaminated sand habitats may not affect ant behavior at all. The data show that indeed Roundup affects ant behavior in sand similarly as in gel; however, more concentrated herbicide is needed to elicit the same behavioral inhibition in the sand-based assays. We therefore reject our hypothesis that direct ingestion of the herbicide is responsible for its inhibitory effect.
Faculty Mentor: Victoria Brown-Kennerly

College Student Empathy Felt Towards Humans and Animals in Relation to Pet Ownership Status: A Quasi-Experiment
Sharalyn Fields
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  The present study investigated the correlation between the pet ownership status of college students and their levels of empathy felt towards humans and animals. Following IRB approval, participants completed an online survey consisting of a demographic questionnaire, the Animal Attitude Scale, and Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Participants who identified themselves as being a current or recent pet owner also completed the Pet Attachment Questionnaire (PAQ). A moderate correlation between being a pet owner and displaying greater amount of empathy for both humans and animals was expected. Additionally, participants who were pet owners and indicated a strong attachment to their pet via the PAQ were expected to display greater amounts of empathy than either non-pet owners or pet owners who did not display strong attachment to their pet. Exploratory analyses examined various participant-level factors (e.g., gender). Regardless of species, owning a companion animal is associated with displaying greater amounts of empathy towards humans and animals, especially so if a strong attachment to one’s pet is present. This research is intended to serve as a resource for future investigators to decipher the most effective ways to engender empathy in people.
Faculty Mentor: Linda Woolf

Utilizing Social Support to Combat Stress in College Students
Alexandra Gill
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  Undergraduate college students are a highly vulnerable population to stress and the negative effects that come with it. This study examined students’ stress levels and their corresponding coping mechanisms, specifically the use of social support (e.g., friends, family, peers, teachers, and counselors) versus other strategies. The undergraduate population at a Midwestern liberal arts university was invited to take part in an online survey measuring stress levels and coping strategies. T-tests will be calculated in order to test the hypotheses that compared to students who do not use functional coping mechanisms, students who utilize a social support group would report (1) lower stress levels, (2) higher GPA, and (3) better attendance habits. This research contributes to the established literature surrounding stress management among college students. Furthermore, these findings hold implications for universities interested in implementing programs to promote social support and reduce stress among college students, the effects of which could have long-term benefits for better academic performance, higher graduation rates, and improved well-being for this population.
Faculty Mentor: Amanda Kracen

Self-Referential Processing Elicited By Words: High Score on Self-Consciousness Correlates With Increased Self-Referential Brain Activity
Nikola Gojcaj, Peter Walla
Webster University, Vienna Campus
  Prior research that used verbal stimuli to induce self-referential processing has shown support for the multiple aspects theory of self (see Walla et al., 2007, 2008 and 2015), which states that there is a non-individualized self (Me1) that does not distinguish between self and other, but distinguishes a non-person related condition from any person engagement and an individualized (Me2) self that clearly distinguishes between self and other. The aim of the present study was to test this theory by showing that a high degree of self-reported self-awareness leads to a more pronounced Me2.  Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to record brain activity changes related to self-referential processing and a self-consciousness questionnaire was used to split participants in two groups, high scores and low scorers. It was found that individuals that scored high on the self-consciousness scale indeed produced more pronounced brain activity related to the Me2 aspect of self compared to those who scored low on this dimension. These findings strongly support the multiple aspects theory of self. They have important implications for future research including clinical investigations, because various psychological disorders are associated with a distorted sense of self. In such cases the grade of self-awareness and also potential variations in Me1 and Me2 processing can be investigated separately.
Faculty Mentor: Peter Walla

The Cold War: An Inevitable “War”
Christian Hargas
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  For my research project, for the fall 2016 semester’s R.A.D conference, I propose a visual arts display, which depicts a visual explanation of the various elements that initiated the Cold War between the United States of America and the Soviet Union. I chose to do this project because it is important for students, faculty and other individuals to understand the various intricacies and components following the conclusion of World War II and heading into what would be considered one of the most controversial “wars” in world history. This presentation will consist of a three-dimensional model of the various elements leading up to the war, from the Soviet Union’s discovery of atomic weaponry to the United States’ practical warnings to Russia, and everything in between. I would hope to have the opportunity to display my visual arts skills, information gathering skills and communication skills about a topic in history of which I am very passionate about.
Faculty Mentor: John Chappell

The Latent Narrative on Criminality in Alban Berg’s Wozzeck
Andrea Hunter
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  Purpose — The purpose of this research is to reclassify the societal and musical significance of Alban Berg’s opera Wozzeck.  The work’s underlying message has often been misunderstood due to a disjunct narrative between the opera, the Büchner play upon which its libretto is based, and the court case that inspired Büchner’s dramatic interpretation of the events.  Common misconceptions about the historical underpinnings of the work are dispelled and an alternative narrative about the work’s statement on the cyclic nature of criminality is offered.  Design Methodology — Research included an examination of authorities on the musical and historical significance of the opera and Büchner’s play. Recently-unsealed medical documents and historical trial lithographs were inspected.   Findings — Wozzeck has been erroneously classified as an explicit statement on mental illness.  However, this interpretation only comports with the historical context of the work if the opera is examined in isolation from the play and case that inspired Berg’s composition.  When one considers all the elements that played a role in the formation of Wozzeck, a latent narrative on the criminal justice system is formed.  Originality/Value — My research contradicts the leading authorities on Berg.
Faculty Mentor: Glen Bauer

Disappearance of Palestinian Folk Art
Sajeda Issa, Editor: Noel Fortman
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  In the film The Disappearance of Palestinian Folk Art, I inquired to find out why many folk art studios in Palestine had closed down over the past century. Through interviews and visits to several different regions of the country, I discovered the daily complications that many artisans encounter such as border control, risking their lives by traveling, and the impossibilities of reaching certain villages because of citizenship.  Resistance can be perceived in different ways. To resist could mean to withstand from an action, or to strive against an opposition. Unfortunately for ones that are put through difficult political/war situations, they have one of two ways to react: resist against oppression, or to stand by and do nothing. This is a decision that nearly every Palestinian has to make. Through the interviews I have conducted, the subjects have discussed how the Israeli government has stifled the creative output of Palestinian folk artists, as well as an economic degradation of Palestine.
Faculty Mentor: Jeri Au

Paws and Effect: A Quasi-Experimental Examination of Pet Influence on Friendship and Workplace Attitudes
Madeline Kuklo
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  Research on differences between dog people and cat people has indicated pet ownership’s potential impact on personality traits. However, its impact in individual environments has not been studied in depth. The present study investigated variability in attitudes in the workplace and toward friends as a function of pet ownership. Data was collected using a cross-sectional, online survey design. Participants completed measures of workplace attitudes (Work Relationships Scale, Khodarahimi et al, 2012) and reciprocal feelings of appreciation within friendships (Appreciation in Friendships Scale, Gordon et al., 2012), as well as other demographic and pet-related items. It was expected that dog people would (1) produce higher appreciation scores than cat people on the Appreciation in Friendships Scale and (2) report higher conformity scores than cat people on the Workplace Relationships Scale. It was expected that cat people would (3) rate higher on critical scores than dog people within the workplace and (4) report lower in appreciative measures within friendships. Primary research questions will be examined using t-tests, while ANOVAs will be used for exploratory analyses. Results of the study would contribute to our understanding of how pet ownership affects different aspects of life including interactions within the workplace and friendships.
Faculty Mentor: Eric Goedereis

Re-examining the Cookie Cutter College Kid:  A Comparison of Student Populations
Sarah Kurzu
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  This study sought to examine whether freshmen and first-year transfer students at a four-year university differed in either academic achievement and/or perceived control. Participants were drawn from the undergraduate freshmen and first year transfer student populations at a Midwestern liberal arts university. Academic achievement was measured using the 3 x 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire (Elliot, Murayama, & Pekrun, 2011) which determined achievement in terms of definition (i.e., self, task, or other) and valence (i.e., approach- or avoidance-based) of competence, and further separated into six goal constructs: task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, and other-avoidance. Perceived control (primary or secondary) was measured using the Academic Control Scale (Perry, Hladkyj, Pekrun, & Pelletier, 2001). It was expected that there will be a significant difference between freshmen and first-year transfer students in both their academic achievement goals and perceived control; transfer students will have higher primary control than freshmen students, freshmen will have higher secondary control than transfer students, and freshmen will demonstrate other-based achievement goals. This study was the first of its kind to compare first year transfer and freshmen students using this combination of measurements. Findings hold implications for educators and support staff interested in promoting adjustment to college.
Faculty Mentor: . Eric Goedereis

Synthesis and Characterization of ß-cyclodextrin Derivatives
Duaa Kuziez, Jason Telford
Maryville University
  ß-cyclodextrin (CD) is a torus-shaped molecule composed of seven α-1,4-linked D-glucopyranose units. Cyclodextrins have been recognized for their ability to form inclusion complexes in aqueous solutions with molecules fitting in the hydrophobic cavity. Functionalization of CD with different chemical groups have applications in fields including drug delivery and enzyme mimetics.  The synthesis of two ß-cyclodextrin derivatives, using methyl anthranilate and ethylene diamine, was carried out.  The products were characterized using IR and NMR and compared to literature values. Future projects could include testing the functionality of the derivatives in catalysis or cellular uptake.
Faculty Mentor: Jason Telford

BREAKING: The Internet s Destroying Democracy! Share if You Agree!!!
Alison Langley
Webster University, Online
  Since the 1980s, Europe and the US have seen a rise in political polarization. Congressional deadlock, hyper-partisanship and incivility are fueled by the proliferation of fake news, partisan media and twisted facts swirling around on social media. As the political middle tunes out, the partisan extremes turn to their own news sites to confirm and harden their beliefs.  This presentation will analyze the connection between the rise of political polarization and increased media choice using media effect theories, particularly selective exposure and confirmation bias. This presentation pays particular attention to media effects of the digital environments of personalization and customization at a time of historically weak social ties to community. This includes an assessment of how increased media choices on the news landscape -- especially that of partisan media, bloviators and fake news — have played into the hands of political extremes. The unintended affects of personalization and the rise of the significance of Internet intermediaries as a news publisher are highlighted.  This research is important because long-term implications of these trends can have consequences for self-government as the population loses a shared information pool. This research adds value to anyone alarmed at political polarization and interested in learning more about news literacy (as opposed to media literacy). It concludes with recommendations for further discussion.
Faculty Mentor: Kit Jenkins

The War on Drugs
Manuel León Hoyos
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  In 1971 U.S. President Nixon declared the War on Drugs. The U.S. has been the largest illicit drug market in the world. Drug-trafficking techniques have developed in sophistication and reach. Drug cartels (DCs) emerged in Colombia in the 1970s and repositioned in Mexico in the 1990s. DCs continue to exist and thrive because of the enormous economic incentives of drug-trafficking combined with the longstanding inability of the U.S. government to reduce the demand for illicit drugs or supply of them into its territory. Little progress was made during Mexican President Calderon’s War on Drug-Trafficking (2006-2012). Mexico experienced escalating levels of violence. This paper argues that the War on Drugs has been a failure and DCs pose an increasing threat to international security, human rights, and political stability. It analyzes (1) data on illicit drug consumption in the U.S, in particular marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamines (2) Incarceration rates since the 1970’s and street drug-trafficking activity by gangs in the U.S. (3) The unpromising results of the Merida Initiative (2008) signed by U.S. and Mexico, and the proliferation of DCs. It concludes that the U.S. government must target illicit drug consumption from a health perspective, increase efforts in prevention and rehabilitation, implement a vigorous tobacco-like campaign, which successfully reduced consumption and gradually decriminalize following successful examples: Portugal, Uruguay and Netherlands.
Faculty Mentor: Robert P. Barnidge, Jr.

Beneath the Death of Emma Bovary
Tianlin Li
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  In Professor Magort Sempreora’s Men Create Women in Literature class, students had a close reading to Gustave Flaubert’s classical novel Madame Bovary, and had a thorough discussion about the nineteenth century French society, where the story is set in. In this novel, the main character Emma engages in love affairs during her marriage and finally ends her life with a tragic suicide. After reading and reflecting on this story, I developed an original thesis around the cause of Emma’s death, and discussed it with my professor, which is: An improper education, clear class distinction, and strong gender bias are main factors that contribute to Emma’s suicide.
Faculty Mentor: Megort Sempreora

Bioassay Guided Chemical Investigation of Nigella Sativa Seeds
Nawal Majid, Hadeya Farooq
Maryville University
  A bioassay guided chemical investigation of N. sativa seeds yielded two major constituents. Nigella Sativa seeds were extracted with Hexanes, Ethyl Acetate, and Methanol. All the three extracts were tested for their antibacterial activity and compared to that of commercially available black seed oil. All these extracts showed better inhibition than commercially available black seed oil.
Faculty Mentor: . Anuradha Vummenthala

The Effect of Color and Verbal Information on Feelings in Humans: Self-report and raw affect
Laura Malik, Peter Walla
Webster University, Vienna Campus
  Color and verbal information form an important part of our experience of the environment around us.  The effects of color and words on emotion are well documented, but have never been researched in a combined presentation.  This study seeks to discover how the interaction between color and verbal information valence, (the positive, negative, or neutral context of words) impacts the emotional response in humans.  We collected both self-report and physiological measures to study cases in which the combined effects of color and text are congruent and contradictory in cognitive and subconscious processes.  The results showed a significant interaction between gender and color with respect to the colors red and blue, where females showed a distinct difference in the self-reported pleasure of both colors while the self-reported pleasure of males for both colors was fairly similar.  It was also found that the colors yellow, red, and green generated more pleasure in self-report and physiological measurements than other colors when paired with the text of positive, negative, and negative valence respectively. Green was the only color to significantly increase reported arousal when paired with positive and negative valence, suggesting that solely the color has an influence on reported arousal regardless of valence.
Faculty Mentor: Peter Walla

Confirmatory Test for Saliva Using the ELISA Method for Identification of Statherin
Nicole Meister, Kayla Stehle, Stacy L. Donovan
Maryville University
  Identification for human saliva is currently limited to chromatographic strip tests for detection of α-amylase. Due to cross reactivity with other mammalian α-amylase and pancreatic amylase, it has multiple ways in which it can create a false-positive. Finding a specific way for identifying saliva could confirm or eliminate questioned samples found at crime scenes more accurately. After reviewing the literature for different substances found in saliva, it was concluded that statherin is the optimal peptide to use (Akutsu, et al. 2009). Statherin is a phosphoprotein secreted by the parotid gland. It is found in only human saliva and does not cross react with other substances (Akutsu, et al. 2009). The goal of this research is to find a way to identify and use this protein for identification of human saliva by means of an immunochromatographic strip test. In the lab, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test was used to develop the assay. First, the ELISA Bio-Rad Explorer test was utilized to obtain hands on experience with the equipment and reagents. Once precision in these techniques was reached, an ELISA protocol for identification of statherin was created. This protocol was tested with different samples of human saliva as well as dog saliva. After multiple tests, it was concluded that a working protocol for ELISA does specifically identify the protein statherin and does not cross react with other species.
Faculty Mentor: Stacy L. Donovan

Deconvoluting the Response to Common Herbicide Compounds in Pogonomyrmex Harvester Ants
Krystal Meza
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  The tunneling behavior of ants is pertinent to colony survival and ecosystem health, yet currently there is little extensive literature evaluating how water and soil contamination affects this behavior. We used Western harvester ant Pogonomyrmex occidentalis as our study subjects in gel-based habitats to quantitatively access tunneling behavior under experimentally controlled conditions of treatments with contamination and without contamination.  Our lab has data showing Roundup “Weed and Grass Concentrate Plus,” a widely used herbicide available at grocery stores, completely inhibits the instinctual tunneling behavior of Pogonomyrmex occidentalis, but it is not lethal to ants.  This Roundup is a complex chemical formulation with at least five ingredients; glyphosate, the much maligned and vilified chemical that kills wild weeds and has garnered much media attention, is only 18% of the total formulation.  We hypothesized that one chemical would be dominantly responsible for the behavioral modification properties of the complex herbicide.  We tested all ingredients individually and in combination, for inhibition of tunneling behaviors. We failed-to-reject our hypothesis, and determined the exact chemical component of Roundup that inhibits ant tunneling, and have characterized its dose-response profile.
Faculty Mentor: Victoria Brown-Kennerly

“Oh My Goodness I’ve Found My Calling:” A Qualitative Study of Career Development of Psychologists Working in Cancer Care
Taylor Michl, Afton Nelson, Hannah Rowald; Nicole Taylor, Trisha Raque-Bogdan, Amanda Kracen
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  Psychologists working in oncology settings is a relatively new field, and because of its short history, the literature concerning the well-being of providers of mental health services is scarce. Little is known about the career development and job satisfaction of psychologists who are tasked with psycho-social needs of cancer patients and survivors. Therefore, this study sets out to explore the factors that have influenced the career development of psychologists working in cancer care. Participants (N=20) were male and female, lived across the United States, and were either currently working or had worked in the field of psycho-oncology. They participated in phone interviews that lasted between 20 and 60 minutes, which were recorded and transcribed. Using Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) methods, the interviews were coded into seven domain categories: (a) career development, (b) sustaining factors and rewards, (c) challenges, (d) future career plans and aspirations, (e) professional identity, (f) advice and training recommendations, and (g) other. Many participants stressed both personal and professional challenges and rewards that shaped their career paths and led them to stay in or leave the field of psycho-oncology. This research will be used to identify specific strengths and shortcomings of the professional experiences of psycho-oncologists that have affected retention rates, as well as give insight to the experiences that influence these rates.
Faculty Mentor: Amanda Kracen

Men and Masculinities in Sports: The Impact of Masculinities on Team Success
Maxi Moss
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  Previous research has examined how masculinities negatively impacts men’s relationships. The present study extended this research by investigating the impact of masculinities on team cohesion and team success in men’s sports. Participants included male student-athletes who had completed at least one season of their sport over the last five years. Using a cross-sectional, online survey design, participants answered questions measuring their masculinity using the Male Role Norms Inventory- short form and Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory-22. Team cohesion was measured using the Group Environment Questionnaire. Team success was measured using winning percentages of the teams reported by participants. Bivariate correlations will be calculated in order to examine the primary research hypothesis that masculinities negatively impacts team cohesion, which, in turn, will be negatively associated with team success. Findings from this study hold important implications. A greater understanding of masculinities may lead to more opportunities to challenge restrictive forms of masculinities. This may provide men with improved relationships not only with themselves but with others as well, which may impact performance on the field. If athletes begin to adopt new, more authentic ways of self-expression in sport participation, this may lead to more inclusive styles of masculinities in other domains of society.
Faculty Mentor: Don Conway-Long

Unlikely Resource: Igniting The role of Spirituality in Nursing Management
Zainab Oyebamiji
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  Without doubt, there is sufficient evidence that stress is an implicit part of the nursing profession. This project ignites the role of “workplace spirituality” in nursing management. As the concept of spirituality continues to sustain significant interest around the globe, its role in improving productivity and promoting a healthy workplace are explored. Accordingly, it is an integral but mostly unnamed aspect of health services that Florence Nightingale intelligibly foresaw as an “element of nursing.” Spirituality in the workplace is a useful concept especially in this era when all else is in flux with unprecedented changes in the healthcare environment, requiring rapid and ready responsiveness. But insufficient evidence, lack of direction, plus the fear of imposing a different value on employees increases the complexity of instilling the concept of workplace spirituality for nurse leaders. Drawing on previous research, spirituality allows people to find meaning in their lives; its integration in the workplace encourages employees to find meaning in their work, thereby stimulating a spirited work environment to which patients come to heal and in which nurses care for themselves. To recapture the heritage of nursing which is rich in spirituality, prospective outcomes of spiritual leadership are described using mindful leadership theory as well as Jean Watson’s theory of human caring for the nurse leader to be alert and conscious and model the ethic of caring to staff and colleagues.  Conclusion: Advance research is needed on how nursing organizations can positively impact patient, organizational and caregiver outcomes.
Faculty Mentor: Susan McFarlan

Mindset and Motivation in Language Learning
Jackson Pierce
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  A student’s mindset about their intelligence affects their academic success. Given the cognitive and social benefits of multilingualism, improving language education is a worthwhile venture. This study examines two specific questions: (1) how does mindset orientation factor into language learning achievement under the socio-educational model, and (2) how do the encounters of one’s target language affect language achievement? The study consisted of a survey distributed digitally to students currently or previously learning a foreign language at college campuses in Webster Groves, Vienna, Leiden, and Geneva. The questionnaire incorporated items from Yeager et al.’s (2016) Fixed Mindset Scale and Gardner’s (2005) Attitude/Motivation Test Battery (AMTB), the latter of which was modified to fit the study. Correlational data of the questionnaire results will be analyzed using SPSS. It is expected that Fixed Mindset Scale scores will be negatively correlated with scores on the AMTB’s motivational subscales and positively correlated with the anxiety subscales, and that more diverse encounters of the target language will be positively correlated with scores on the AMTB’s motivational subscales. Study findings hold implications for improving language learning models.
Faculty Mentor: Heather Mitchell

Adolescents and Altruism
Sarah Pringer, Eric Goedereis
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  Objectives: The current study uses Social Categorization Theory to experimentally examine whether or not volunteering has an effect on the well-being of adolescents, as well as whether egocentrism is associated with variability in well-being. Methods: Adolescents between the ages of 15-18 completed a pretest of egocentrism (the New Personal Fable Scale), subjective well-being (EPOCH Measure of Adolescent Well-Being), and volunteerism (the Revised Personal Functions of Volunteerism Scale). The students were then randomly assigned to complete three volunteer hours with either older adults or a youth group. Following the volunteer experience, participants completed a post-test of the earlier measures in order to examine changes in well-being and other key study variables. Results: Based on Social Categorization Theory, it was hypothesized that all participants would see increases in well-being following volunteering, but that adolescents who volunteered with other youth will see a greater increase in their well-being compared to adolescents who volunteer with the elderly. Finally, it was hypothesized that those who have high levels of egocentrism will not see an impact to their well-being.  T-tests will be conducted in order to examine the primary hypotheses, with exploratory analyses to follow.
Faculty Mentor: Eric Goedereis

Personal Reflections on the Research Process: The Importance of Passion, Scientific Thinking, Collaboration, and Patience
Jennifer M. Pierce, Maria Escalona, Samra Sahbegovic, Kathryn Larimer, Centron Felder, and Ria Jackson
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
Part 1
  All applied research textbooks stress the importance of using the scientific approach, a few texts highlight collaboration, but our Applied Educational Psychology and School Psychology graduate students have found that passion for their research topic and patience with the research process are also necessary. In Part I, the first of two panel presentations, three graduate students describe their experiences with applied research projects in the early stages of development. Samra Sahbegovic will discuss her passion for her thesis topic, Navigating a New Life: Supporting Refugee Students Through a Whole-School Approach. She will explain why she chose the research topic and how she developed her title, abstract, and research proposal. She will review all that is involved in obtaining approval from Webster’s Institutional Review Board (IRB). Maria Escalona will discuss collaboration and cross-cultural challenges in research. She will explain the political situation in Venezuela and how difficult it is to find accurate, objective research studies about Venezuela, women’s roles, and cross-cultural comparisons. Jennifer Pierce will speak about patience and the challenges of working on two different research projects at the same time. She will discuss the requirement of persevering and not giving up when needing to write, rewrite, and then revise again research proposals. She will also talk about how to find funding for research presentations at professional conferences and the process of working with Webster’s Student Government Association (SGA).
Part 2
  In Part 2, the second of two panel presentations, three Applied Educational Psychology and School Psychology students describe their experiences with applied research projects in the later stages of development. Kathryn Larimer will describe her collaborative contributions to research on young children’s mental health, a project that was later presented by her colleagues at the 2016 International School Psychology Association conference in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. She will also discuss her newest research which she wants to present, in person, at the 2017 International School Psychology Association conference in Manchester, England. Kathryn will discuss her experiences interviewing research participants, transcribing the interviews, and then analyzing the data. She will explain how her work for the 2016 ISPA conference will help her with the 2017 ISPA conference presentations. Centron Felder will share his professional experiences attending and presenting at the 2016 International School Psychology Association and the special rehearsals they did for their conference presentations in Amsterdam. He will also speak about his year-long study of issues surrounding child trafficking and schools and what is involved in becoming an expert on a topic. Finally, Ria Jackson will talk about passion and courage as she describes the experience of presenting a symposium at Columbia University in New York. Ms. Jackson was involved in a collaborative study of 54 schools responses to the Ferguson crisis. Webster University sent an abstract proposal to the Columbia University Winter Roundtable, a conference on cultural issues in psychology and education. After the symposium was accepted for presentation, the intensive preparation for the presentation began. Ria Jackson will describe the symposium experience at Columbia University. The six Webster University graduate students from Part 1 and Part 2 will inspire the audience to become researchers who make meaningful contributions to professional knowledge and benefit others.
Faculty Mentor: Deborah Stiles

Current Use of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Julia Sader
Webster University, Geneva Campus
  Everyday thousands of diagnoses are made using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Therefore, it is crucial to investigate this tool used by the medical community. Not only is the DSM used for diagnosis but it also influences the treatment plans and outcomes of patients. Different versions of the DSM can result in different diagnoses and outcomes. For example, the DSM-5 no longer recognizes specific diagnoses, such as Asperger’s Syndrome, or Pervasive Developmental Disorders PDD. Instead, there is now just a single diagnosis, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)” (Gadow, 1991, p. 844). The reason for the change given by The American Psychiatric Association (APA) was that these diagnoses were not properly applied by physicians throughout the world. However, there is little research in understanding how the DSM is currently used by the medical community. The influence of such an important tool is complex, and therefore requires further investigation. This study seeks to address this gap in the literature by interviewing psychiatrists on their process of diagnosis, and more specifically on how they use the DSM in their practice. This study will therefore provide insights into the challenges of diagnosis, and how the DSM is used in day-to-day practice. Insights will also be gained into the perceived implications and impact of the changes of the DSM from the practitioner’s viewpoint.
Faculty Mentor: Liza Jachens

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Academic Self-Efficacy in College Students
Rebecca Shuler
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Academic Self-Efficacy in undergraduate students.  ACEs have been linked to a number of negative physical and mental health outcomes for adults.  Academic Self-Efficacy has been demonstrated to be related to academic performance and persistence, while depression and other negative mental and physical health symptoms have been associated with lowered self-efficacy.  Participants completed an online survey which included four measures: (1) the Adverse Childhood Experiences Inventory-Revised, (2) the Academic Self-Efficacy subscale, (3) the Inventory of College Students’ Resilience, and (4) the Multidimensional Survey of Perceived Social Support.  The measures of perceived social support and resilience were included as potential mediating factors for experience of adversity in childhood. It was expected that higher scores on the Adverse Childhood Experiences Inventory would be correlated with lower rates of Academic Self-Efficacy. In addition, higher scores of resilience and perceived social support were anticipated to mediate the effects of adversity on self-efficacy scores.  These findings may help to increase support for college students who otherwise might not experience success in school due to early experiences of trauma and adversity, increasing the chance of positive academic outcomes.
Faculty Mentor: Amanda Kracen

A novel ant farm to study magnetoreception of Western harvester ants
Beltran Torres, Ravin Kodikara, Victoria Brown-Kennerly
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  The Western harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex occidentalis) is a species of ant commonly found in western states of United States. Found commonly in grasslands and deserts of altitude 1,900 meters or below, the Western Harvester ants play an important role in the earth’s ecosystem by contributing to subterranean processes such as biomantling and bioturbation.  Magnetoreception or the ability to sense magnetic field has been identified among certain species of birds, bees, ants and also in several microorganisms.  Recent experiments have shown that these species have the ability to use earth’s magnetic field for homing or migration. However, the magnetoreception of Western harvester ants has not been studied.  For my senior thesis research, I am studying the behavioral responses of western harvester ants to physical changes in the environment including their ability for magnetoreception. In this poster, I would like to give a detailed description about the novel experimental setup I constructed to study magnetoreception. I will be explaining the schematics of the construction, the electronic sensors and other instruments used, different experimental parameters considered and the overall strategy behind this construction. I believe the information I am hoping to share will be beneficial to many Webster students who are planning to get involved in similar research projects in future.
Faculty Mentor: Ravin Kodikara and Victoria Brown-Kennerly

Genetic Identification of Fungal Samples from Select Missouri and Illinois Caves: Implications for the Distribution of Pseudogymnoascus destructans and White Nose Syndrome
Sandra Van Berkel, Gabriel J. Colbeck
Maryville University
  Pseudogymnoascus destructans is an invasive fungal species that is responsible for mass die-offs among North American bat populations. While it is known that the pathogen is rapidly spreading through Midwestern North America (from the east), its fine scale distribution and distribution within cave systems is not well understood. We hypothesized that certain caves and/or locales within caves might be free of Pseudogymnoascus and thus provide refuges from the pathogen. We collected air, soil and water samples from five Missouri and Illinois caves at distances from 0 ft to 450 ft. Utmost care was taken to decontaminate all clothing and equipment before we entered and after we exited each cave. Appropriate landowner and/or conservation agency permission was obtained before we entered any cave. We cultured all samples in the lab on fungus specific media, extracted DNA, performed PCR and sequenced ~750 bp of the ITS region of rRNA. We performed a maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis on 130 samples along with twenty reference sequences from Genbank (Fig. 1). Our samples fall into three well defined phyla – Zygomycota, Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. Within Ascomycota, there are three well defined genera – Candida/Humicola, Penicillium and Pseudogymnoascus. We used Genbank and the Fungal Barcoding Project to assign samples to species where possible, but most of our designations could only be made to the genus level (due to a lack of resolution at our genetic marker). All phyla/genera were found relatively uniformly in air, water and soil samples (data not shown). All phyla/genera were also found relatively uniformly across caves and distances from the entrance (data not shown). While we could make tentative designations of Pseodogymnoasus destructans and its sister species, P. roseus, we chose to conservatively interpret our data and say that all Pseudogymnoascus genus designations have the possibility of being destructans. Contrary to our expectations, the prevalence of Pseudogymnoascus actually increases (albeit weakly) as one moves deeper into the cave (Fig. 2).  While we did find Pseudogymnoascus in each cave, some caves had limited prevalence – it didn’t show up until 40’-60’ in Mushroom Cave, until 80’-60’ in Little Crystal Cave and is absent from Sherwood Forest Cave at all intermediate distances (Fig. 3). Our results support a scenario in which Pseudogymnoascus is found in soil, water and the air and could easily be spread by cave drafts, flowing water, bats, insects or small mammals.  Our results also support a ‘patchwork’ hypothesis under which certain parts of cave systems may be free of Pseudogymnoascus and potentially support healthy bat populations. To be clear, the genetic marker that we used did not have the ability to robustly differentiate P. destructans from its closest relative, P. roseus, so we can not say definitively that P. destructans was present in our sampled caves. Future work will focus on adding additional genetic loci.
Faculty Mentor: Gabriel J. Colbeck

Thermal Expansion within Hydrogen Bonded Co-crystals
Frank Verdu, Ryan Groeneman
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  Solids that respond to external stimuli, such as changes in temperature, are still of great interest in the design of new materials. Thermal expansion is a common example of how a material can response to an external stimulus such as heat.  It is well known in the chemical literature, that the thermal properties of a solid can change upon addition of a second component producing a co-crystal.  The introduction of a resorcinol-like template will form a multicomponent organic solid based upon hydrogen bonds.  In order to determine the thermal parameters multi-temperature crystallographic studies have been conducted to determine the values and type of thermal expansion within each co-crystal.  In this presentation, the overall structures and thermal expansion parameters of each co-crystals will be discussed along with special attention given to how these hydrogen bonds contribute to the overall thermal values.
Faculty Mentor: Ryan Groeneman

Human Rights Violations and Corruption in Liberal and Socialist Societies: A Comparative Study between Chile and Venezuela.
Valeria Veroes
Webster University, International Campus
  Human Rights Violations and Corruption in Liberal and Socialist Societies: A Comparative Study between Chile and Venezuela.  To comprehend human rights violations in Chile and Venezuela, it is important to look closely at the corruption and to study the rule of law in both state and the international treaties that have been signed and ratified. In the case of Latin America, the states have taken examples for their rule of law from the Napoleonic and Common law. In Chile and Venezuela, the systems have failed to respect, protect or fulfill the law.  This study will look at how two countries in the same region deals with human rights violations and corruption. The thesis explores how a liberal government such as Chile and a socialist government such as Venezuela differ on said themes. A qualitative approach for research was used, by firstly looking at the political, economic scene and legal systems in Chile and Venezuela. The comparative study analyses both countries from the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. This research will look at which political system has been most successful at tackling corruption and human rights.  Valeria Veroes
Faculty Mentor: Elodie Tranchez

An Enlightening experiment in French Theatre: how Close-reading can enhance your Engineering skills
Charlotte Wester
Webster University, Webster Groves Campus
  My goal is to explain why an interdisciplinary approach enhanced greatly my skills as a Lighting engineer at Webster University. I will demonstrate how the close-reading of the play by Sartre, in the original French (Dr. Lionel Cuillé), combined with discussion with my advisor in Lighting (Dr. Perter Sargent) enriched my design for the performance of the French company Company Caravague. I will also show how I would put together the Lighting show if I were to be in charge of the play at the Odeon theater, in Paris, with a sophisticated equipment. Finally, I will explain how this interdisciplinary project thanks to my double-major in French/ Lighting, will increase my job prospects.
Faculty Mentor: Lionel Cuillé

The White Resistance Movement: Connection Between the Civil Rights Movement and Today’s  Political Divide
Brenna Whitehurst, Saint Louis University
Lisa Camp, Webster University University
  In the 1960s the United States experienced a huge political shift with the presidential election  cycles of John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon.  During that time the Civil Rights Movement was  emerging, which prompted a backlash from the pro-segregation countermovement as led by  presidential candidate George Wallace.  With the 1960s presidential election cycles and the Civil  Rights Movement, we see the rise of white resistance movements.  Those movements have  resurfaced once again during the 2016 presidential election cycle due in part to Donald Trump’s  racist and xenophobic rhetoric, and, in part, to the emergence of the Black Lives Matter  Movement.  There are many parallels between the 1960s presidential election cycles and the  current presidential election cycle between Trump and Hillary Clinton.  Our research will cover  many facets of the 1960s American history, including economic and cultural aspects, to show the  connections between the Civil Rights Movement and the Black Lives Matter Movement and  between the 1960s and 2016 election cycles.  Essentially, the racial tensions that we are seeing  today are not new constructs.  The new segregationist countermovement is responding to #BLM  with #AllLivesMatter, and with presidential candidates from both the 1960s and today,  outwardly embracing racist ideologies, we see many similarities in the preponderance of racial  tensions then and now.
Faculty Mentor: Terri Reilly

First Year Seminar Inquiry Showcase
This Showcase features the results of inquiry projects conducted by students in various First Year Seminars during the Fall 2016 semester. It includes poster presentations, films and artifacts that reflect the results of our invitation to first year undergraduate students as to answer questions of personal importance and become “creators” as well as “consumers” of research.
Student projects from the following seminars will be featured:

The Art of the Shoe
Beginning to Commence
Angels and Demons
The Global Garden and Tea
Friends Without Benefits
Schools for Today and What Gets in the Way
Who Me, An Entrepreneur?
Mother and Father, Parent No More
The Pursuit of Happiness
In Malala’s footsteps:  How young people experience, embrace, reject, and transform gender roles in the world’s faith traditions.