Drug and Alcohol Policy

Updated 10/23/14

The Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989 requires Webster University to certify that it has adopted and implemented a drug and alcohol abuse prevention program as a condition of receiving federal funds and financial assistance. The law further requires the annual distribution of written policies to each enrolled student. In accordance with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989 and Webster University’s mission, this document restates the University’s commitment to maintaining an environment which is free of impairment and encourages both academic growth and personal development.

POLICY STATEMENT

This policy statement applies to all students enrolled at Webster University, including students taking classes at extended metropolitan campuses, military campuses, and academic programs located overseas.

It is the goal of Webster University to protect the public health and environment of its members by promoting an environment free of illicit drug use and alcohol abuse.

The manufacture, distribution, possession or use of illicit drugs, and the unlawful possession, use or distribution of alcohol on any Webster University campus or at any University event is prohibited.

Violation of this policy will be handled according to existing University policies and procedures governing the conduct of students, staff, and faculty.

Standards of Conduct - Illicit Drugs

The unlawful manufacture, possession, distribution, or use of illicit drugs on any Webster University campus or site by University students, employees, or their guests is prohibited.

Standards of Conduct - Alcohol

Federal legislation prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of alcohol. The laws of all states are in compliance with federal law, which prohibits persons under 21 years of age from the possession or use of alcohol. Foreign countries in which Webster University operates fully accredited programs may have laws which vary from U.S. Federal and State laws.

Students at non-U.S. campuses may contact the office of the campus director for information regarding the legal use and possession of alcohol in that country.

In St. Louis, the Dean of Students Office maintains standards governing the allowable use of alcohol on campus and at campus events. The office of the campus director maintains similar standards at each extended campus site.

LEGAL SANCTIONS

Drugs: In the United States the manufacture, possession, sale, distribution and use of illicit drugs is prohibited by city, county, state, and federal law. Sanctions range from small fines to life imprisonment, depending on the type of drug and several other factors (see Chart One).

In countries other than the United States, sanctions vary. Contact the campus director’s office for specific information.

Alcohol: Each state has specific statues which detail sanctions for the illegal purchase or possession of intoxicating liquor. For example, in the State of Missouri, violation of state statutes governing the use or possession of alcohol may result in fines of between $50 and $1,000 and/or imprisonment for a maximum of one year. County and municipal ordinances contain similar prohibitions and sanctions. Contact the office of the campus director for information regarding provision of applicable ordinances and statutes at your particular campus/location.

Overseas Programs: Students visiting foreign countries to attend academic programs overseas are reminded that they may be subject to arrest and legal sanctions for drug and alcohol offenses under the laws and regulations of that particular country or institution, in addition to relevant Webster University sanctions.

HEALTH RISKS

Drugs: Severe health risks, including death, are associated with the use of illicit drugs (see Chart Two).

Alcohol: Abuse of alcohol can produce severe health risks, including death. Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses significantly impair the judgement and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses of alcohol also increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts, including spouse and child abuse. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked impairments in higher mental functions, severely altering a person’s ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described.

Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life-threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as brain and the liver.

Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than other youngsters of becoming alcoholics.

AVAILABLE DRUG OR ALCOHOL COUNSELING, TREATMENT OR REHABILITATION PROGRAMS

At the St. Louis campus, the Counseling and Life Development department provides confidential information, counseling support, and referral services for Webster University students and employees. This department maintains resource listings of community services available in the St. Louis metropolitan area and offers a comprehensive alcohol/drug assessment and treatment program. Students may find assistance through the Counseling and Life Development department by calling 314 968-7030. The department is located at 540 Garden Avenue.

At campuses outside the St. Louis area, Webster University personnel provide information and guidance covering local services for drug and alcohol problems. All such contacts are strictly confidential.

UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINARY PROCEEDINGS

Different disciplinary procedures are applicable to faculty, staff, and students. Violations of the standards of conduct will be dealt with on a case-by-case basis with the imposition of discipline being appropriate to the severity of the violation. For each group comprising the University community, there are certain common sanctions that could be applied in an appropriate case. These common sanctions include letters of reprimand, probation and severance of ties with the University, through expulsion or termination. Normally, opportunity for referral to an appropriate rehabilitation program occurs and is usually associated with a first offense. Referral for prosecution will usually occur only for the most serious violations.

For Students

Guidelines for disciplinary sanctions are available in the Student Code of Conduct. Copies are available from the Dean of Students Office in St. Louis or from the appropriate campus director.

CHART 1:DRUG TRAFFICKING PENALTIES

DRUGS

 FEDERAL SANCTIONS

 MISSOURI SANCTIONS

 ILLINOIS SANCTIONS

Schedule I - heroin, cocaine, ecgonine, PCP, LSD, Propanamide, Methamphetamine

Larger amounts: mandatory 10 years-life,

$4-20 million fine;

Smaller amounts: 5 years-life

$2-10 million fine.

Up to 30 years or life; up to $20,000 fine

4-60 years (heroin, cocaine, LSD, morphine); 4-30 years (peyote, barbiturates, amphetamines, pentazocine, methaqualone) up to $500,000 fine or value of illegal drugs if greater.

Other, Schedule I and Schedule II

Up to 20 years or life; $1-10 million fine

5-15 years; up to $20,000 fine

 2-5 years; $150,000 up to $200,000 fine

 Marijuana, hashish, hashish oil, or Schedule III

Up to 10 years; $250,000-2 million fine

5-30 years or life; up to $20,000 fine

2-5 years; up to $125,000 fine

Schedule IV-V

Up to 6 years; $100,000-2 million fine

5-15 years; up to $20,000 fine

 2-5 years; up to $100,000 fine

CHART 2: CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES, USES AND EFFECTS

Drugs/CSA Schedules

Trade or Other Names

Medical Uses

Physical Dependence

Psychological Dependence

Tolerance

Duration (Hours)

Usual Methods of Administration

Possible Effects

Effects of Overdose

Withdrawal Syndrome

NARCOTICS

Opium/II, III, V

Dover's Powder, Paregoric, Parepectolin

Analgesic, antidiarrheal

High

High

Yes

3-6

Oral, smoked

Euphoria, drowsiness, respiratory depression, constricted pupils, nausea

Slow and shallow breathing, clammy skin, convulsions, coma, possible death

Watery eyes, runny nose, yawning, loss of appetite, irritability, tremors, panic, cramps, nausea, chills and sweating

Morphine/II, III

Morphine, MS-Contin, Roxanol, Roxanol-SR

Analgesic, antitussive

High

High

Yes

3-6

Oral, smoked, injected

see above

see above

see above

Codeine/II, III, V

Tylenol with codeine, Empririn with condeine, Robitussan A-C, Florinal with codeine

Analgesic, antitussive

Moderate

Moderate

Yes

3-6

Oral, injected

see above

see above

see above

Heroin/I

Diacetylmorphine, Horse, Smack

None

High

High

Yes

3-6

Inject ed, sniffed, smoked

see above

see above

see above

Hydromorphone/II

Dilaudid

Analgesic

High

High

Yes

3-6

Oral, injected

see above

see above

see above

Meperidine (Pethidine)/II

Demerol, Mepergan

Analgesic

High

High

Yes

3-6

Oral, injected

see above

see above

see above

Methadone/II

Dolophine, Methadone, Methadone

Analgesic

High

High-Low

Yes

12-24

Oral, injected

see above

see above

see above

Other Narcotics/ I, II, III, IV, V

Numorphan, Percodan, Percocet, Tylox, Tussionex, Fentanyl, Darvon, Lomotil, Talwin*

Analgesic, antidiarrheal, antitussive

High-Low

High-Low

Yes

Variable

Oral, injected

see above

see above

see above

DEPRESSANTS

Chloral Hydrate

/IV

Noctec

Hypnotic

Moderate

Moderate

Yes

5-8

Oral

Slurred speech, disorientation, drunken behavior without odor of alcohol

Shallow respiration, clammy skin, dilated pupils, weak and rapid pulse, coma, possible death

Anxiety, insomnia, tremors, delirium, convulsions, possible death

Barbiturates/ II, III, IV

Anytal, Butisol, Florinal, Lotusate, Nembutal, Seconal, Tuinal, Phenobarbital

Anesthetic, anticonvulstant, sedative, hypnotic, veterinary euthanasia agent

High-Mod.

High-Mod.

Yes

1-16

Oral

see above

see above

see above

Benzodiazepines/IV

Ativan, Dalmane, Diazepam, Librium, Xanax, Serax, Valium, Tranxexe, Verstran, Versed, Halcion, Paxipam, Restoril

Antianxiety, anticonvulstant, sedative, hypnotic

Low

Low

Yes

4-8

Oral

see above

see above

see above

Methaqualone/I

Quaalude

Sedative, hypnotic

High

High

Yes

4-8

Oral

see above

see above

see above

Glutethimide/III

Doriden

Sedative, hypnotic

High

Moderate

Yes

4-8

Oral

see above

see above

see above

Other Depressants/III

Equanil, Miltown, Noludar, Placidyl, Valmid

Antianxiety, sedative, hypnotic

Moderate

Moderate

Yes

4-8

Oral

see above

see above

see above

 

Drugs/CSA Schedules

Trade or Other Names

Medical Uses

Physical Dependence

Psychological Dependence

Tolerance

Duration (Hours)

Usual Methods of Administration

Possible Effects

Effects of Overdose

Withdrawal Syndrome

STIMULANTS

Cocaine/II**

Coke, Flake, Snow, Crack

Local anesthetic

Possible

High

Yes

1-2

Sniffed, smoked, injected

Increased alertness, excitation, euphoria, increased pulse rate and blood pressure, insomnia, loss of appetite

Agitation, increase in body temperature, hallucinations, convulsions, possible death

Apathy, long periods of sleep, irritability, depression, disorientation

Amphetamines

/II

Biphetamine, Delcobese, Desoxyn, Dexedrine, Obetrol

Attention deficit disorders, narcolepsy, weight control

Possible

High

Yes

2-4

Oral,

injected

see above

see above

see above

Phenmetrazine

/II

Preludin

Weight control

Possible

High

Yes

2-4

Oral,

injected

see above

see above

see above

Methylphenidate

/II

Ritalin

Attention deficit disorders, narcolepsy

Possible

Moderate

Yes

2-4

Oral,

injected

see above

see above

see above

Other Stimulants/III, IV

Adipex, Cylert, Didrex, Ionamin, melfiat, Plegine, Sanorex, Tenuate, Pepanil, Prelu-2

Weight control

Possible

High

Yes

2-4

Oral,

injected

see above

see above

see above

 

Drugs/CSA Schedules

Trade or Other Names

Medical Uses

Physical Dependence

Psychological Dependence

Tolerance

Duration (Hours)

Usual Methods of Administration

Possible Effects

Effects of Overdose

Withdrawal Syndrome

HALLUCINOGENS

LSD/I

Acid, Microdot

None

None

Unknown

Yes

8-12

Oral

Illusions and hallucinations, poor perception of time and distance

Longer and more intense "trip" episodes, psychosis, possible death

Withdrawal syndrome not reported

Mescaline & Peyote/I

Mexc, Buttons, Cactus

None

None

Unknown

Yes

8-12

Oral

see above

see above

see above


Amphetamine Variants/I

2.5-DMA, PMA, STP, MDA, MDMA, TMA, DOM, DOB

None

Unknown

Unknown

Yes

Variable

Oral, injected

see above

see above

see above

Phencyclidine/II

PCP, Angel Dust, Hog

None

Unknown

High

Yes

Days

Smoked, oral, injected

see above

see above

see above

Phencyclidine Analogues/I

PCE, PCPy, TCP

None

Unknown

High

Yes

Days

Smoked, oral, injected

see above

see above

see above

Other Hallucinogens/I

Bufotenine, Ibogaine, DMT, DET, Psilocybin, Psilocyn

None

None

Unknown

Possible

Variable

Smoked, oral, injected, sniffed

see above

see above

see above

Drugs/CSA Schedules

Trade or Other Names

Medical Uses

Physical Dependence

Psychological Dependence

Tolerance

Duration (Hours)

Usual Methods of Administration

Possible Effects

Effects of Overdose

Withdrawal Syndrome

CANNABIS

Marijuana/I

Pot, Acapulco Gold, Grass, Reefer, Sinsemilla, Thai Sticks

None

Unknown

Moderate

Yes

2-4

Smoked, oral

Euphoria, relaxed inhibitions, increased appetite, disoriented behavior

Fatigue, paranoia, possible psychosis

Insomnia, hyperactivity, and decreased appetite occasionally reported

Tetrahydro- cannabinol/I,II

THC, Marinol

Cancer chemotherapy antinauseant

Unknown

Moderate

Yes

2-4

Smoked, oral

see above

see above

see above

Hashish/I

Hash

None

Unknown

Moderate

Yes

2-4

Smoked, oral

see above

see above

see above

Hashish Oil/I

Hash Oil

None

Unknown

Moderate

Yes

2-4

Smoked, oral

see above

see above

see above

                         

1 Designated a narcotic under the CSA. 2 Not designated a narcotic under the CSA.