Our Mission

The School of Education is a supportive and inclusive community of educator-scholars who are committed to providing our students with transformative experiences that impact life-long learning.

Our Vision

We empower students to become effective, innovative, and empathetic educators and practitioners.

teacher speaking with students
teacher and student talking

CAEP Annual Reporting Measures

The Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) requires that the School of Education (SoE) publicly report candidate performance data and other consumer information on its website. Following is the list of CAEP’s annual reporting measures with supporting evidence for each measure. Learn more about the CAEP Standards.

As is consistent with other Educator Preparation Programs (EPPs) in the state of Missouri, Webster University uses data from the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) to assess impact on P-12 learning and development.

DESE Employee Survey 

In collaboration with the University of Missouri’s Office of Social and Economic Data Analysis (OSEDA), DESE administers an annual survey of employers of first year teachers—typically their principals—in Missouri public schools. The principals are asked, “Based upon the performance-based evaluation of this first year teacher, how would you rate his/her impact upon students?”

A minimum of 15 responses is required for DESE to provide the data for a given survey item for a single year (actual n sizes are not provided). In most years, Webster University receives an insufficient number of responses to yield any data for this survey item. However, when we combine two years' worth of data at a time, we are able to report the results in two-year increments.

The results of this survey item are listed in the table below. Available data show that the majority (92% in 2018-2019; 87% in 2017-2018; 74% in 2016-2017; 73% in 2015-2016) of our completers’ employers perceive them to be effective or highly effective at impacting students.

 

  Highly Effective (4) Effective (3) Minimally Effective (2) Ineffective (1) Mean Standard Deviation
2018-2019 22% 70% 7% 0% 3.15 0.52
2017-2018 33% 54% 8% 4% 3.17 0.75
2016-2017 37% 37% 19% 7% 3.04 0.92
2015-2016 33% 40% 20% 7% 3.00 0.89

SOE Employee Survey

Respondents to the SoE's annual alumni survey are asked if we may contact their employers regarding their performance. Employers are then asked the following question related to impact on P-12 learning and development: "Based upon the performance-based evaluation of this teacher, how would you rate his/her impact on students' learning and development?"

The results of this survey item are listed in the table below. Available data show that 100% of our completers' employers perceive them to be effective or highly effective at impacting students. There is no SOE employer survey data available for 2020.

 

   Highly
Effective (4)
 Effective (3)  Minimally
Effective (2)
 Ineffective (1) Mean  Standard
Deviation
2019*
(n=3)
 100%  0%  0%  0%  4.00  0.00

*In 2018, the SoE began distributing its own survey to employers of its alumni. However, it was not until the 2019 distribution of this survey that we included any survey items to assess impact on P-12 learning and development.

The School of Education assesses the teaching effectiveness of its completers using several methods—its own alumni survey, its own employer survey*, DESE’s first year teachers survey, and DESE’s first year teachers’ employers survey.

*The SoE began administering its own employer survey in Spring 2018; there are no employer survey data available prior to 2018.

SOE Alumni Survey and Employer Survey

The Missouri Teacher Standards outline nine standards based on teaching theory that indicate teaching effectiveness to provide high academic achievement for all students. The School of Education surveys its graduates and their employers three years after completing their teaching program to assess how well our program prepared them to be effective teachers. Survey items have been aligned to these nine Missouri Teacher Standards. The results of these surveys can be viewed at the links below.

2020   |   2019  |   2018   |   2017

DESE First Year Teachers Survey and Employers Survey

DESE's annual survey of first year teachers in Missouri public schools contains 39 questions that are aligned to the nine Missouri Teacher Standards, with anywhere from two to seven survey items per standard. Additionally, there is one survey item related to technology. DESE also surveys the employers of first year teachers in Missouri public schools, using the same survey items. Webster University's results for these two surveys since 2015 can be viewed at the link below.

Trending Data Since 2015

Satisfaction of Employers

DESE Employer Survey

DESE administers an annual survey of employers of first year teachers—typically their principals—in Missouri public schools. The principals are asked to reflect on their perspective about the overall quality of the professional education program their employee completed.

A minimum of 15 responses is required for DESE to provide the data for a given survey item in a given year (actual n sizes are not provided). In most years, Webster University does not receive a sufficient number of responses to yield any data for this survey item. However, when we combine two years' worth of data at a time, we are able to report the results in two-year increments.

The results of this survey item are listed in the table below. Available data show that the majority (85% in 2018-2019; 80% in 2017-2018; 76% in 2016–2017; 84% in 2015-2016) of our completers’ employers perceive our EPP to be of good or very good quality.

 

  Very Good (5) Good (4) Fair (3) Poor (2) Very Poor (1) Mean Standard Deviation
2018-2019 37% 48% 11% 4% 0% 4.19 0.77
2017-2018 38% 42% 17% 4% 0% 4.13 0.83
2016-2015 38% 38% 15% 8% 0% 4.08 0.92
2015-2016 37% 47% 11% 5% 0% 4.16 0.81

 

SOE Employer Survey

Respondents to the SoE's annual alumni survey are asked if we may contact their employers regarding their performance. Employers are then asked the following question related to employer satisfaction: "When considering this employee's performance in working with P-12 students, how satisfied are you with the preparation he/she received in his/her professional education program at Webster University?"

The results of this survey item are listed in the table below. Available data show that 100% of our completers' employers are satisfied or highly satisfied with the preparation they received from Webster University, with the majority of the respondents indicating that they are highly satisfied. There is no SOE employer survey data available for 2020.

 

    Highly Satisfied (4) Satisfied (3) Minimally
Satisfied (2)
Unsatisfied (1) Mean Standard
Deviation
2019* Initial Programs
(n=3)
 67% 33% 0% 0% 3.67 0.47
2019* Advanced Programs
(n=6)
100% 0% 0% 0% 3.67 0.00

 

*In 2018, the SoE began distributing its own survey to employers of its alumni. However, it was not until the 2019 distribution of this survey that we included a survey item to assess employer satisfaction.

Additional comments from employers regarding their satisfaction with our completers are listed below (identifying information has been removed):

  • [Initial Program Completer] has grown into a leader and very strong teacher in our special education department.
  • [Advanced Program Completer] is a dedicated teacher with a strong work ethic.
  • It has been a joy to work with [Advanced Program Completer].

Employment Milestones

SOE Alumni Survey

The School of Education's annual alumni survey includes survey items to assess our completers’ retention and promotion/tenure. The results of these survey items can be viewed at the links below.

2020   |   2019   |   2018

The School of Education assesses the satisfaction of its completers using several methods—its own alumni survey, the university’s outcomes survey (distributed by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness), and the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s first year teachers survey. The compiled results of these surveys can be viewed at the links below.

2020   |   2019   |   2018   |   2017

Data on Webster University's graduation (and retention) rates are compiled by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness (OIE). The reports below are provided for students, parents, and the university community.

Retention and Graduation Rates of First-Time, Full-Time Degree-Seeking Freshmen

Retention and Graduation Rates of New Degree-Seeking Transfers

Retention and Graduation Rates of New Degree-Seeking Graduate Students

Due to differences in the tracking and reporting methods of the OIE and the School of Education, these reports do not indicate the graduation rates of CAEP-specific programs. The SoE continues to work on a methodology for more accurately calculating the graduation rates of students in its CAEP programs.

The School of Education requires that all initial teacher candidates complete and pass all state requirements—with the exception of the Missouri Pre-Service Teacher Assessment (MoPTA)—prior to graduation. Annual Performance Report (APR) data from the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE)—as well as data from Title II reports—show that our completers have a 100% pass rate on the MoPTA—demonstrating that all of our completers meet state certification requirements.

View Webster University’s DESE APR Summary Reports

The SoE has made its Title II Reports publicly available on its website since 2009.

View Webster University’s Title II Reports

The School of Education uses data from two separate surveys to assess the ability of its completers to be hired in education positions for which they have been prepared—its own alumni survey and the university’s outcomes survey (distributed by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness). The compiled results of these surveys can be viewed at the links below.

2020   |   2019   |   2018   |   2017

The university's outcomes survey collects data about recent graduates' employment and continuing education status. The Career Planning and Development Center, in collaboration with the Office of Institutional Effectiveness, has summarized the employability of Webster University graduates aggregating a comprehensive success rate for each school and college. The comprehensive success rate includes graduates who are employed, both full and part time, and those continuing their education. The university's outcomes survey is administered electronically five times per year, each year, to recent graduates from the university. The compiled results can be viewed at the links below.

2019   |   2018   |   2017

Federal regulations require colleges and universities to provide to prospective and enrolled students specific consumer information concerning the institution, financial aid, and institutional policies. Such consumer information can be found at the links below*. In addition, information concerning Webster University is available at the National Center for Education Statistics.

Consumer Information

Financial Aid Consumer Information

Student Loan Default Rates (Fiscal Years 2015, 2014, 2013)
(OPE-ID = 002521)

*Webster University provides aggregate data for student loan default rates and other consumer information. Statistics provided are not specific to the School of Education; nor do they differentiate between initial certification programs, advanced programs, or CAEP-exempt programs.

Assessment & Accreditation

Webster University’s School of Education has developed and delivers high-quality programs to ensure that educators receive the best preparation for current and new contexts. In addition to adhering to the guidelines of the Higher Learning Commission (HLC), the School of Education also adheres to the guidelines of other organizations with a focus on strengthening educator preparation.

In 2007, the School of Education received accreditation from the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and had its accreditation renewed in 2013. NCATE has since merged with another organization to create the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), and the School of Education is already in the process of addressing the new CAEP standards in preparation for our next accreditation visit.

Webster University is also approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) to offer coursework and programs that lead to Missouri state educator certification in more than 28 different areas. Most of these programs are housed in the School of Education, and all certification programs work closely with the School of Education to ensure that candidates seeking these certifications will meet the requirements of the state.

The School of Education also complies with federal policies by submitting annual Title II reports, which report on programs that lead to initial teaching certification (i.e., a first teaching license with the state).

The Missouri Standards for the Preparation of Educators (MoSPE) outline the expectations for programs that are preparing educators for certification in Missouri. In order to ensure that programs are meeting these expectations, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) established an Annual Performance Report for Educator Preparation Programs (APR-EPP) to measure the performance of educator preparation programs (EPPs) in valid, accurate and meaningful ways. The APR-EPP is based on the MoSPE performance standards and provides a mechanism by which to review and approve EPPs at the certification program level.

Prior to 2018, a single APR was published for all academic programs within a single EPP. In 2018, DESE began publishing separate versions of the APR for an EPP's Teacher Certification Program and its School Leader & School Counselor Programs. In 2019, DESE began publishing separate versions of the APR for an EPP's Teacher Certification Program, its School Leader Program, and its School Counselor Program. Webster University did not receive a School Counselor APR for the 2018-2019 year due to an insufficient number of certificate-eligible candidates. 

Section 205 of Title II of the Higher Education Act (HEA) of 1965, as amended in 2008, requires that each institution of higher education (IHE) that conducts a traditional or alternative teacher preparation program submit annual reports containing key requirements and characteristics of their programs to their respective states. States are required to submit annual reports to the U.S. Department of Education containing data on all of the IHEs and organizations that offer teacher preparation programs in their state.

Webster University's School of Education programs are recognized for their excellence and approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

 

Additional national recognitions have been awarded to the following graduate programs through the Specialized Professional Association (SPA) process:

 

The Association for Behavior Analysis International has verified the courses for Webster University's Special Education Applied Behavior Analyst (ABA) program toward the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Behavior Analyst® or Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst® examination. Applicants will need to meet additional requirements before they can be deemed eligible to take the examination.

School of Education: Intercultural Research Center

The Applied Educational Psychology and School Psychology programs in the School of Education have an Intercultural Research Center, which is housed in Webster Hall Room 245 (and in 2020 on Zoom). In the Applied Educational Psychology programs, we use our knowledge of psychology and research methodology in order to understand and help others, especially children and youth in schools. Our intercultural research includes both international and multicultural perspectives and we explore topics such as international children’s rights, social justice, cross-cultural studies of youth, children’s mental health, refugee and asylum-seeking youth, racial attitudes, cultural awareness, schools’ responses to the crisis in Ferguson, Missouri, the impact of the 2016 presidential election on school climate, the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in the United States, child trafficking, the psychological impact of separating children from families, and the impact of COVID-19 on children’s mental health and international children’s rights.

All our students are given opportunities to contribute to the “knowledge base” of child and adolescent psychology as well as multicultural and international psychology. Since 2011, we have given fifty-two student-faculty professional presentations at national and international conferences and published six articles in international journals.

Stiles, D. A., Lucas, J., Swan, S., Hammad, M., Cooperman, K., & Scoggins, H. (2011, July). Two compassionate classrooms: A multi-method study from the "Heartland" of the United States. [Poster presentation]. International School Psychology Association in Chennai, India.

Stiles, D. A., Lucas, J. E., Blake, N. L., Hilliard, A., Tinzmann, E., Khoury, L. & Woodard, A. (2013). A pilot study of an international social justice module: Supporting children within a social justice framework. International Psychology Bulletin, 17, 20-25.

Stiles, D. A., Cooperman, K. L., Kern, H. S., Palermo, T. (2013, February). Cultural considerations in the preparation of psychoeducational assessment reports about children of Bosnian descent. [Poster presentation]. Annual Meeting of the Society for Cross-Cultural Research, Mobile, Alabama.

Stiles, D. A., Moore, A. L., Lucas, J. E., Rajan, J., Goel, G. (2015). Adolescents’
drawings about school and school subjects: Perspectives of youth from India compared with youth from seven other countries. Journal of the Indian Academy of Applied Psychology, 41(1), 16-24.

Stiles, D. A., Moyer, J. M., Brewer, S., Falconer, J., Klaus, L. M., Moss, L. (2015).
Practising [sic] Psychology in challenging times: Schools and the Ferguson crisis. Child & Educational Psychology, 32(4), 22-38.

Bluehen-Unger, R. G., Stiles, D. A., Falconer, J., Grant, T. R., Boney, E. J., &. Brunner, K. K. (2017). An exploration of culturally grounded youth suicide prevention programs for Native American and African American youth. International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, 16(2),48-61.

Stiles, D. A., Felder, C., & Monsour, T. (2017, August). Psychologists’ roles in raising awareness about child trafficking in Missouri’s schools: An exploratory study. [Poster presentation and paper]. 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association. Washington, D.C.

Korstanje, K.C., Thomas, A.J., Aton-Wade, S.E., Richards, N.L., Felder, C., Castor, M., Stiles, D.A., and Falconer, J.W. (2018, March). Racial injustice, posttraumatic healing and organizational resilience in St. Louis schools. [Poster presentation and paper]. APA Division 48 national conference of Psychology & Peace 2018, South Bend, Indiana.

Stiles, D.A., Suchland, E., Chaki, K., & Castor, M. F. (2020, February). The
Psychological impact of separating immigrant children from their families: A
report to the House Oversight Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. [Symposium] Annual Meeting of the Society for Cross-Cultural Research/APA International Psychology, Seattle, Washington.

Stiles, D. A., Alaraudanjoki, E. Wilkinson, L. R., Ritchie, K.L. (2020). Researching the
effectiveness of Tree of Life: An Imbeleko approach to counseling refugee youth. Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40653-
019-00286-w

Stiles, D.A., Chaki, K., Suchland, E., Baker, X., Alaraudanjoki, E., Carter-Hoener, O., Copple, B., Fleming, A., Nersisyan, D., Hakobyan, V., & Golobic, K. (2020, December). The impact of COVID-19 on international children’s rights and children’s mental health in the United States, Japan, Finland, Armenia, and Puerto Rico: A preliminary investigation. [Poster presentation]. 78th Annual Conference of the International Council of Psychologists.

The Intercultural Research Center is a collaborative research center that excels in the application of psychological science to benefit the best interests, well-being, and human rights of children, adolescents, families, educators, and communities.

In all its research initiatives, the Intercultural Research Center considers diversity and inclusion issues for all children and youth. All children and youth include young people from all socioeconomic backgrounds, races, ethnicities, cultures, languages, geographic locations, religions, genders, and abilities. 

Five faculty members are involved—full-time professor Dr. Deborah Stiles (Director of the Intercultural Research Center), full-time professor Dr. Yin Lam Lee-Johnson, and Visiting International Scholar, Dr. Esa Alaraudanjoki.  Adjunct professors include Dr. Jameca Cooper and Dr. Sheila Mihalick.


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